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Manipulative Therapies: What Works - American Family Physician

Feb 15, 2019 - Manipulative therapies include osteopathic manipulative treatment and many other forms of manual therapies used to manage a variety of conditions in adults and children. Spinal manipulative therapy may provide short-term improvement in patients with acute or chronic low back pain, ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2019/0215/p248.html

Migraine Headache Prophylaxis - American Family Physician

Jan 1, 2019 - Migraines impose significant health and financial burdens. Approximately 38% of patients with episodic migraines would benefit from preventive therapy, but less than 13% take prophylactic medications. Preventive medication therapy reduces migraine frequency, severity, and ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2019/0101/p17.html

Evaluation of Suspected Dementia - American Family Physician

Mar 15, 2018 - Dementia is a significant and costly health condition that affects 5 million adults and is the fifth leading cause of death among Americans older than 65 years. The prevalence of dementia will likely increase in the future because the number of Americans older than 65 years is expected ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2018/0315/p398.html

Nonoperative Management of Cervical Radiculopathy - American Family Physician

May 1, 2016 - Cervical radiculopathy describes pain in one or both of the upper extremities, often in the setting of neck pain, secondary to compression or irritation of nerve roots in the cervical spine. It can be accompanied by motor, sensory, or reflex deficits and is most prevalent in persons 50 ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2016/0501/p746.html

Primary Brain Tumors in Adults: Diagnosis and Treatment - American Family Physician

Feb 1, 2016 - Primary intracranial tumors of the brain structures, including meninges, are rare with an overall five-year survival rate of 33.4%; they are collectively called primary brain tumors. Proven risk factors for these tumors include certain genetic syndromes and exposure to high-dose ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2016/0201/p211.html

Delirium in Older Persons: Evaluation and Management - American Family Physician

Aug 1, 2014 - Delirium is defined as an acute, fluctuating syndrome of altered attention, awareness, and cognition. It is common in older persons in the hospital and long-term care facilities and may indicate a life-threatening condition. Assessment for and prevention of delirium should occur at ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2014/0801/p150.html

Prevention and Treatment of Motion Sickness - American Family Physician

Jul 1, 2014 - Motion sickness is a common syndrome that occurs upon exposure to certain types of motion. It is thought to be caused by conflict between the vestibular, visual, and other proprioceptive systems. Although nausea is the hallmark symptom, it is often preceded by stomach awareness, ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2014/0701/p41.html

Pharmacologic Management of Pain at the End of Life - American Family Physician

Jul 1, 2014 - Although many patients experience debilitating pain at the end of life, there are many options to improve analgesia and quality of life. Pain assessment using a validated tool, with attention to patient function and specific goals, helps tailor individual treatment plans. The World ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2014/0701/p26.html

Recognition and Evaluation of Nontraumatic Subarachnoid Hemorrhage and Ruptured ...

Oct 1, 2013 - Swift diagnosis and treatment are critical for good outcomes in patients with nontraumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage, which is usually caused by a ruptured aneurysm. This type of stroke often results in death or disability. Rates of misdiagnosis and treatment delays for subarachnoid ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2013/1001/p451.html

Evaluation of First Nonfebrile Seizures - American Family Physician

Aug 15, 2012 - Nonfebrile seizures may indicate underlying disease or epilepsy. The patient history can often distinguish epileptic seizures from nonepileptic disorders by identifying the events directly preceding the convulsion, associated conditions, and details of the seizure, including triggers, ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2012/0815/p334.html

Rational Use of Opioids for Management of Chronic Nonterminal Pain - American Family ...

Aug 1, 2012 - Opioid prescribing for chronic nonterminal pain has increased in recent years, although evidence for its long-term effectiveness is weak and its potential for harm is significant. Nonmedical use of prescription opioids, diversion, and overdose deaths have also increased sharply, ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2012/0801/p252.html

Primary Brain Tumors in Adults - American Family Physician

May 15, 2008 - Primary malignant brain tumors account for 2 percent of all cancers in U.S. adults. The most common malignant brain tumor is glioblastoma multiforme, and patients with this type of tumor have a poor prognosis. Previous exposure to high-dose ionizing radiation is the only proven ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2008/0515/p1423.html

Management of Head and Neck Injuries by the Sideline Physician - American Family Physician

Oct 15, 2006 - Injuries to the head and neck are common in sports. Sideline physicians must be attentive and prepared with an organized approach to detect and manage these injuries. Because head and neck injuries often occur simultaneously, the sideline physician can combine the head and neck ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2006/1015/p1357.html

Dementia With Lewy Bodies: An Emerging Disease - American Family Physician

Apr 1, 2006 - Dementia with Lewy bodies appears to be the second most common form of dementia, accounting for about one in five cases. The condition is characterized by dementia accompanied by delirium, visual hallucinations, and parkinsonism. Other common symptoms include syncope, falls, sleep ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2006/0401/p1223.html

Behavior Disorders of Dementia: Recognition and Treatment - American Family Physician

Feb 15, 2006 - Psychosis may pose a greater challenge than cognitive decline for patients with dementia and their caregivers. The nature and frequency of psychotic symptoms varies over the course of illness, but in most patients, these symptoms occur more often in the later stages of disease. ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2006/0215/p647.html

Initial Evaluation of Vertigo - American Family Physician

Jan 15, 2006 - Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, acute vestibular neuronitis, and Meniere's disease cause most cases of vertigo; however, family physicians must consider other causes including cerebrovascular disease, migraine, psychological disease, perilymphatic fistulas, multiple sclerosis, and...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2006/0115/p244.html

Medications for Migraine Prophylaxis - American Family Physician

Jan 1, 2006 - Sufficient evidence and consensus exist to recommend propranolol, timolol, amitriptyline, divalproex, sodium valproate, and topiramate as first-line agents for migraine prevention. There is fair evidence of effectiveness with gabapentin and naproxen sodium. Botulinum toxin also has ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2006/0101/p72.html

Psychogenic Nonepileptic Seizures - American Family Physician

Sep 1, 2005 - Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures are episodes of movement, sensation, or behaviors that are similar to epileptic seizures but do not have a neurologic origin; rather, they are somatic manifestations of psychologic distress. Patients with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures frequently are...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2005/0901/p849.html

Methadone Treatment for Pain States - American Family Physician

Apr 1, 2005 - Methadone is a synthetic opioid with potent analgesic effects. Although it is associated commonly with the treatment of opioid addiction, it may be prescribed by licensed family physicians for analgesia. Methadone's unique pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics make it a valuable option ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2005/0401/p1353.html

Management of Cluster Headache - American Family Physician

Feb 15, 2005 - Cluster headache, an excruciating, unilateral headache usually accompanied by conjunctival injection and lacrimation, can occur episodically or chronically, and can be difficult to treat. Existing effective treatments may be underused because of underdiagnosis of the syndrome. Oxygen ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2005/0215/p717.html

Efficient Identification of Adults with Depression and Dementia - American Family ...

Sep 15, 2004 - Family physicians must decide how to screen for depression or dementia and which patients to screen. Mental health questionnaires can be helpful. In practice-based screening, questionnaires are administered to all patients, regardless of risk status. In case-finding screening, ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2004/0915/p1101.html

Craniosynostosis - American Family Physician

Jun 15, 2004 - Skull deformity in infants continues to be a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Deformational plagiocephaly is a common and somewhat benign cause of skull deformity in infants that must be distinguished from the more serious craniosynostosis, which occurs alone or as a syndrome. ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2004/0615/p2863.html

Guillain-Barre Syndrome - American Family Physician

May 15, 2004 - Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is a group of autoimmune syndromes consisting of demyelinating and acute axonal degenerating forms of the disease. Nerve conduction study helps differentiate the heterogeneous subtypes of GBS. Patients exhibit a progressive paralysis that reaches a plateau ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2004/0515/p2405.html

Transient Ischemic Attacks: Part I. Diagnosis and Evaluation - American Family Physician

Apr 1, 2004 - Transient ischemic attack is no longer considered a benign event but, rather, a critical harbinger of impending stroke. Failure to quickly recognize and evaluate this warning sign could mean missing an opportunity to prevent permanent disability or death. The 90-day risk of stroke after...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2004/0401/p1665.html

Regional Anesthesia For Office Procedures: Part I. Head and Neck Surgeries - American ...

Feb 1, 2004 - Although local anesthesia usually is used in surgical procedures, field or nerve blocks can provide more effective anesthesia in some situations. In a field block, local anesthetic is infiltrated around the border of the surgical field, leaving the operative area undisturbed. In field ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2004/0201/p585.html

Diagnostic Approach to Tinnitus - American Family Physician

Jan 1, 2004 - Tinnitus is a common disorder with many possible causes. Most cases of tinnitus are subjective, but occasionally the tinnitus can be heard by an examiner. Otologic problems, especially hearing loss, are the most common causes of subjective tinnitus. Common causes of conductive hearing ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2004/0101/p120.html

Delirium - American Family Physician

Mar 1, 2003 - Delirium is characterized by an acute change in cognition and a disturbance of consciousness, usually resulting from an underlying medical condition or from medication or drug withdrawal. Delirium affects 10 to 30 percent of hospitalized patients with medical illness; more than 50 ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2003/0301/p1027.html

Seizure Disorders in the Elderly - American Family Physician

Jan 15, 2003 - Seizure disorders become increasingly common after the age of 60 years and can have a significant impact on functional status. The goal of antiepileptic drug therapy is to control seizures but preserve quality of life. If possible, seizure control should be achieved with one agent given...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2003/0115/p325.html

The Management of the Acute Migraine Headache - American Family Physician

Dec 1, 2002 - As many as 30 million Americans have migraine headaches. The impact on patients and their families can be tremendous, and treatment of migraines can present diagnostic and therapeutic challenges for family physicians. Abortive treatment options include nonspecific and migraine-specific ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2002/1201/p2123.html

Guidelines for Managing Alzheimer's Disease: Part II. Treatment - American Family ...

Jun 15, 2002 - Once the clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease has been made, a treatment plan must be developed. This plan should include cholinesterase inhibitor therapy to temporarily improve cognition or slow the rate of cognitive decline, management of comorbid conditions, treatment of ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2002/0615/p2525.html

Infant Botulism - American Family Physician

Apr 1, 2002 - Although the worldwide incidence of infant botulism is rare, the majority of cases are diagnosed in the United States. An infant can acquire botulism by ingesting Clostridium botulinum spores, which are found in soil or honey products. The spores germinate into bacteria that colonize ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2002/0401/p1388.html

Charcot Foot: The Diagnostic Dilemma - American Family Physician

Nov 1, 2001 - Primary care physicians involved in the management of patients with diabetes are likely to encounter the diagnostic and treatment challenges of pedal neuropathic joint disease, also known as Charcot foot. The acute Charcot foot is characterized by erythema, edema and elevated ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2001/1101/p1591.html

Concussion in Sports: Minimizing the Risk for Complications - American Family Physician

Sep 15, 2001 - Mild traumatic brain injury, or concussion, is a common consequence of collisions, falls and other forms of contact in sports. Concussion may be defined as an acute trauma-induced alteration of mental function lasting fewer than 24 hours, with or without preceding loss of consciousness....

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2001/0915/p1007.html

Early Diagnosis of Dementia - American Family Physician

Feb 15, 2001 - Until recently, the most significant issue facing a family physician regarding the diagnosis and treatment of dementia was ruling out delirium and potentially treatable etiologies. However, as more treatment options become available, it will become increasingly important to diagnose ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2001/0215/p703.html

Preventing Stroke in Patients with Transient Ischemic Attacks - American Family Physician

Nov 15, 1999 - Stroke is the third most common overall cause of death and the leading cause of adult disability in the United States. New therapeutic interventions instituted in the period immediately after a stroke have revolutionized the approach to ischemic cerebrovascular disease. Recognition of a...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1999/1115/p2329.html

Update on Parkinson's Disease - American Family Physician

Apr 15, 1999 - Parkinson's disease is a progressive degenerative disorder of the central nervous system. The hallmark physical signs are tremor, rigidity and bradykinesia. Idiopathic Parkinson's disease is caused by the progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and nigrostriatal...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1999/0415/p2155.html

Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: Lou Gehrig's Disease - American Family Physician

Mar 15, 1999 - Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), commonly called Lou Gehrig's disease, is a progressive neuromuscular condition characterized by weakness, muscle wasting, fasciculations and increased reflexes. Approximately 30,000 Americans currently have the disease. The annual incidence rate is ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1999/0315/p1489.html

New Drugs for Alzheimer's Disease - American Family Physician

Oct 1, 1998 - Alzheimer's disease is characterized by degeneration of various structures in the brain, with development of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Deficiencies of acetylcholine and other neurotransmitters also occur. Pharmacologic treatment of the disease generally seeks to ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1998/1001/p1175.html

Pseudoneurologic Syndromes: Recognition and Diagnosis - American Family Physician

May 15, 1998 - Physicians may encounter patients with a collection of psychologic disorders that present with neurologic symptoms or signs, yet have no identifiable structural or functional etiology within the nervous system. These disorders comprise the so-called pseudoneurologic syndromes, which can...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1998/0515/p2485.html

Lumbar Spine Stenosis: A Common Cause of Back and Leg Pain - American Family Physician

Apr 15, 1998 - Lumbar spine stenosis most commonly affects the middle-aged and elderly population. Entrapment of the cauda equina roots by hypertrophy of the osseous and soft tissue structures surrounding the lumbar spinal canal is often associated with incapacitating pain in the back and lower ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1998/0415/p1825.html

Diagnostic Approach to the Confused Elderly Patient - American Family Physician

Mar 15, 1998 - Confusion in the elderly patient is usually a symptom of delirium or dementia, but it may also occur in major depression and psychoses. Until another cause is identified, the confused patient should be assumed to have delirium, which is often reversible with treatment of the underlying ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1998/0315/p1358.html

An Algorithm for the Evaluation of Peripheral Neuropathy - American Family Physician

Feb 15, 1998 - The diagnosis of peripheral neuropathies can be frustrating, time consuming and costly. Careful clinical and electrodiagnostic assessment, with attention to the pattern of involvement and the types of nerve fibers most affected, narrows the differential diagnosis and helps to focus the ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1998/0215/p755.html

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