Search Results for

*

1-100 of 170 ResultsHelp using search on aafp.org Sort by Relevance , Date , Title

A Practical Approach to Uncomplicated Seizures in Children - American Family Physician

Sep 1, 2000 - Uncomplicated seizures and epilepsy are common in infants and children. Family physicians should be aware of certain epilepsy syndromes that occur in children, such as febrile seizures, benign focal epilepsy of childhood, complex partial epilepsy, juvenile myoclonic epilepsy and video ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2000/0901/p1109.html

Abdominal Wall Pain: Clinical Evaluation, Differential Diagnosis, and Treatment - ...

Oct 1, 2018 - Abdominal wall pain is often mistaken for intra-abdominal visceral pain, resulting in expensive and unnecessary laboratory tests, imaging studies, consultations, and invasive procedures. Those evaluations generally are nondiagnostic, and lingering pain can become frustrating to the ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2018/1001/p429.html

Acute Brachial Plexus Neuritis: An Uncommon Cause of Shoulder Pain - American Family ...

Nov 1, 2000 - Patients with acute brachial plexus neuritis are often misdiagnosed as having cervical radiculopathy. Acute brachial plexus neuritis is an uncommon disorder characterized by severe shoulder and upper arm pain followed by marked upper arm weakness. The temporal profile of pain preceding ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2000/1101/p2067.html

Acute Lumbar Disk Pain: Navigating Evaluation and Treatment Choices - American Family ...

Oct 1, 2008 - Acute lumbar disk herniations are the most common cause of sciatica. After excluding emergent causes, such as cauda equina syndrome, epidural abscess, fracture, or malignancy, a six-week trial of conservative management is indicated. Patients should be advised to stay active. If ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2008/1001/p835.html

Acute Migraine Headache: Treatment Strategies - American Family Physician

Feb 15, 2018 - Migraine is a primary headache disorder characterized by recurrent attacks. Acetaminophen, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, triptans, antiemetics, ergot alkaloids, and combination analgesics have evidence supporting their effectiveness in the treatment of migraine. Acetaminophen ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2018/0215/p243.html

Acute Stroke Diagnosis - American Family Physician

Jul 1, 2009 - Stroke can be categorized as ischemic stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage, and subarachnoid hemorrhage. Awakening with or experiencing the abrupt onset of focal neurologic deficits is the hallmark of ischemic stroke diagnosis. The most common presenting symptoms for ischemic stroke are ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2009/0701/p33.html

Advances in the Treatment of Epilepsy - American Family Physician

Jul 1, 2001 - Significant advances have been made in the diagnosis and treatment of epilepsy over the past decade. With the advent of electroencephalographic video monitoring, physicians are now able to reliably differentiate epilepsy from other conditions that can mimic it, such as pseudoseizures. ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2001/0701/p91.html

Alzheimer Disease: Pharmacologic and Nonpharmacologic Therapies for Cognitive and ...

Jun 15, 2017 - Alzheimer disease comprises a syndrome of progressive cognitive and functional decline. Treatments should target cognitive and functional symptoms. Cholinesterase inhibitors, memantine, and a combination of a cholinesterase inhibitor and memantine have produced statistically significant...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2017/0615/p771.html

Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: Lou Gehrig's Disease - American Family Physician

Mar 15, 1999 - Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), commonly called Lou Gehrig's disease, is a progressive neuromuscular condition characterized by weakness, muscle wasting, fasciculations and increased reflexes. Approximately 30,000 Americans currently have the disease. The annual incidence rate is ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1999/0315/p1489.html

An Algorithm for the Evaluation of Peripheral Neuropathy - American Family Physician

Feb 15, 1998 - The diagnosis of peripheral neuropathies can be frustrating, time consuming and costly. Careful clinical and electrodiagnostic assessment, with attention to the pattern of involvement and the types of nerve fibers most affected, narrows the differential diagnosis and helps to focus the ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1998/0215/p755.html

Antidepressants and Antiepileptic Drugs for Chronic Non-Cancer Pain - American Family ...

Feb 1, 2005 - The development of newer classes of antidepressants and second-generation antiepileptic drugs has created unprecedented opportunities for the treatment of chronic pain. These drugs modulate pain transmission by interacting with specific neurotransmitters and ion channels. The actions of...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2005/0201/p483.html

Approach to Acute Headache in Adults - American Family Physician

May 15, 2013 - Approximately one-half of the adult population worldwide is affected by a headache disorder. The International Headache Society classification and diagnostic criteria can help physicians differentiate primary headaches (e.g., tension, migraine, cluster) from secondary headaches (e.g., ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2013/0515/p682.html

Assessment and Management of Concussion in Sports - American Family Physician

Sep 1, 1999 - The most common head injury in sports is concussion. Athletes who sustain a prolonged loss of consciousness should be transported immediately to a hospital for further evaluation. Assessment of less severe injuries should include a thorough neurologic examination. The duration of ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1999/0901/p887.html

Behavior Disorders of Dementia: Recognition and Treatment - American Family Physician

Feb 15, 2006 - Psychosis may pose a greater challenge than cognitive decline for patients with dementia and their caregivers. The nature and frequency of psychotic symptoms varies over the course of illness, but in most patients, these symptoms occur more often in the later stages of disease. ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2006/0215/p647.html

Behavioral Disorders in Dementia: Appropriate Nondrug Interventions and Antipsychotic ...

Aug 15, 2016 - Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia pose management challenges for caregivers and clinicians. Firstline nonpharmacologic treatments include eliminating physical and emotional stressors, modifying the patient’s environment, and establishing daily routines. Family members ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2016/0815/p276.html

Bell's Palsy: Diagnosis and Management - American Family Physician

Oct 1, 2007 - Bell's palsy is a peripheral palsy of the facial nerve that results in muscle weakness on one side of the face. Affected patients develop unilateral facial paralysis over one to three days with forehead involvement and no other neurologic abnormalities. Symptoms typically peak in the ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2007/1001/p997.html

Cerebral Palsy: An Overview - American Family Physician

Jan 1, 2006 - The presentation of cerebral palsy can be global mental and physical dysfunction or isolated disturbances in gait, cognition, growth, or sensation. It is the most common childhood physical disability and affects 2 to 2.5 children per 1,000 born in the United States. The differential ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2006/0101/p91.html

Cerebrospinal Fluid Analysis - American Family Physician

Sep 15, 2003 - Lumbar puncture is frequently performed in primary care. Properly interpreted tests can make cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) a key tool in the diagnosis of a variety of diseases. Proper evaluation of CSF depends on knowing which tests to order, normal ranges for the patient's age, and the ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2003/0915/p1103.html

Cervical Radiculopathy: Nonoperative Management of Neck Pain and Radicular Symptoms - ...

Jan 1, 2010 - Cervical radiculopathy is a disease process marked by nerve compression from herniated disk material or arthritic bone spurs. This impingement typically produces neck and radiating arm pain or numbness, sensory deficits, or motor dysfunction in the neck and upper extremities. Magnetic ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2010/0101/p33.html

Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy: A Common Cause of Spinal Cord Dysfunction in Older ...

Sep 1, 2000 - Cervical spondylotic myelopathy is the most common cause of spinal cord dysfunction in older persons. The aging process results in degenerative changes in the cervical spine that, in advanced stages, can cause compression of the spinal cord. Symptoms often develop insidiously and are ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2000/0901/p1064.html

Challenges in Pain Management at the End of Life - American Family Physician

Oct 1, 2001 - Effective pain management in the terminally ill patient requires an understanding of pain control strategies. Ongoing assessment of pain is crucial and can be accomplished using various forms and scales. It is also important to determine if the pain is nociceptive (somatic or visceral ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2001/1001/p1227.html

Charcot Foot: Clinical Clues, Diagnostic Strategies, and Treatment Principles - ...

May 1, 2018 - Acute Charcot neuroarthropathy of the foot and ankle is often difficult to diagnose because of limited findings in the patient history, physical examination, imaging, and laboratory studies. Delay in treatment results in the development of rigid foot and ankle deformities, increasing ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2018/0501/p594.html

Charcot Foot: The Diagnostic Dilemma - American Family Physician

Nov 1, 2001 - Primary care physicians involved in the management of patients with diabetes are likely to encounter the diagnostic and treatment challenges of pedal neuropathic joint disease, also known as Charcot foot. The acute Charcot foot is characterized by erythema, edema and elevated ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2001/1101/p1591.html

Chronic Daily Headache: Diagnosis and Management - American Family Physician

Apr 15, 2014 - Chronic daily headache is defined as the presence of a headache on 15 days or more per month for at least three months. The most common types of chronic daily headache are chronic migraines and chronic tension-type headaches. If a red flag for a secondary cause of headache is present, ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2014/0415/p642.html

Chronic Low Back Pain: Evaluation and Management - American Family Physician

Jun 15, 2009 - Chronic low back pain is a common problem in primary care. A history and physical examination should place patients into one of several categories: (1) nonspecific low back pain; (2) back pain associated with radiculopathy or spinal stenosis; (3) back pain referred from a nonspinal ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2009/0615/p1067.html

Chronic Nonmalignant Pain in Primary Care - American Family Physician

Nov 15, 2008 - A systematic approach to chronic nonmalignant pain includes a comprehensive evaluation; a treatment plan determined by the diagnosis and mechanisms underlying the pain; patient education; and realistic goal setting. The main goal of treatment is to improve quality of life while ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2008/1115/p1155.html

Classification of Tremor and Update on Treatment - American Family Physician

Mar 15, 1999 - Tremor is a symptom of many disorders, including Parkinson's disease, essential tremor, orthostatic tremor, cerebellar disease, peripheral neuropathy and alcohol withdrawal. Tremors may be classified as postural, rest or action tremors. Symptomatic treatment is tailored to the tremor ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1999/0315/p1565.html

Clinical Evaluation and Treatment Options for Herniated Lumbar Disc - American Family ...

Feb 1, 1999 - Degeneration of the intervertebral disc from a combination of factors can result in herniation, particularly at the L4-5 and L5-S1 levels. The presence of pain, radiculopathy and other symptoms depends on the site and degree of herniation. A detailed history and careful physical ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1999/0201/p575.html

Cluster Headache - American Family Physician

Jul 15, 2013 - Cluster headache causes severe unilateral temporal or periorbital pain, lasting 15 to 180 minutes and accompanied by autonomic symptoms in the nose, eyes, and face. Headaches often recur at the same time each day during the cluster period, which can last for weeks to months. Some ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2013/0715/p122.html

Common Questions About Bell Palsy - American Family Physician

Feb 1, 2014 - Bell palsy is an acute affliction of the facial nerve, resulting in sudden paralysis or weakness of the muscles on one side of the face. Testing patients with unilateral facial paralysis for diabetes mellitus or Lyme disease is not routinely recommended. Patients with Lyme disease ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2014/0201/p209.html

Concussion in Sports: Minimizing the Risk for Complications - American Family Physician

Sep 15, 2001 - Mild traumatic brain injury, or concussion, is a common consequence of collisions, falls and other forms of contact in sports. Concussion may be defined as an acute trauma-induced alteration of mental function lasting fewer than 24 hours, with or without preceding loss of consciousness....

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2001/0915/p1007.html

Craniosynostosis - American Family Physician

Jun 15, 2004 - Skull deformity in infants continues to be a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Deformational plagiocephaly is a common and somewhat benign cause of skull deformity in infants that must be distinguished from the more serious craniosynostosis, which occurs alone or as a syndrome. ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2004/0615/p2863.html

Current Concepts in Concussion: Evaluation and Management - American Family Physician

Jan 15, 2012 - Concussion is a disturbance in brain function caused by direct or indirect force to the head. It is a functional rather than structural injury that results from shear stress to brain tissue caused by rotational or angular forces—direct impact to the head is not required. Initial ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2012/0115/p123.html

Current Concepts in Concussion: Initial Evaluation and Management - American Family ...

Apr 1, 2019 - Mild traumatic brain injury, also known as concussion, is common in adults and youth and is a major health concern. Concussion is caused by direct or indirect external trauma to the head resulting in shear stress to brain tissue from rotational or angular forces. Concussion can affect a...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2019/0401/p426.html

Cyclooxygenase-2 Enzyme Inhibitors: Place in Therapy - American Family Physician

Jun 15, 2000 - Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) play a major role in the management of inflammation and pain caused by arthritis. A new class of NSAIDs that selectively inhibit the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) enzyme has been developed. The first COX-2 inhibitors, celecoxib and rofecoxib, are...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2000/0615/p3669.html

Delirium - American Family Physician

Mar 1, 2003 - Delirium is characterized by an acute change in cognition and a disturbance of consciousness, usually resulting from an underlying medical condition or from medication or drug withdrawal. Delirium affects 10 to 30 percent of hospitalized patients with medical illness; more than 50 ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2003/0301/p1027.html

Delirium in Older Persons: Evaluation and Management - American Family Physician

Aug 1, 2014 - Delirium is defined as an acute, fluctuating syndrome of altered attention, awareness, and cognition. It is common in older persons in the hospital and long-term care facilities and may indicate a life-threatening condition. Assessment for and prevention of delirium should occur at ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2014/0801/p150.html

Dementia With Lewy Bodies: An Emerging Disease - American Family Physician

Apr 1, 2006 - Dementia with Lewy bodies appears to be the second most common form of dementia, accounting for about one in five cases. The condition is characterized by dementia accompanied by delirium, visual hallucinations, and parkinsonism. Other common symptoms include syncope, falls, sleep ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2006/0401/p1223.html

Diagnosis and Management of Multiple Sclerosis - American Family Physician

Nov 15, 2004 - Multiple sclerosis, an idiopathic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system, is characterized pathologically by demyelination and subsequent axonal degeneration. The disease commonly presents in young adults and affects twice as many women as men. Common presenting symptoms ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2004/1115/p1935.html

Diagnosis of Acute Stroke - American Family Physician

Apr 15, 2015 - Stroke can be categorized as ischemic stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage, or subarachnoid hemorrhage. Awakening with or experiencing the abrupt onset of focal neurologic deficits is the hallmark of the diagnosis of ischemic stroke. The most common presenting symptoms of ischemic stroke ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2015/0415/p528.html

Diagnostic Approach to the Confused Elderly Patient - American Family Physician

Mar 15, 1998 - Confusion in the elderly patient is usually a symptom of delirium or dementia, but it may also occur in major depression and psychoses. Until another cause is identified, the confused patient should be assumed to have delirium, which is often reversible with treatment of the underlying ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1998/0315/p1358.html

Diagnostic Approach to Tinnitus - American Family Physician

Jan 1, 2004 - Tinnitus is a common disorder with many possible causes. Most cases of tinnitus are subjective, but occasionally the tinnitus can be heard by an examiner. Otologic problems, especially hearing loss, are the most common causes of subjective tinnitus. Common causes of conductive hearing ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2004/0101/p120.html

Differentiation and Diagnosis of Tremor - American Family Physician

Mar 15, 2011 - Tremor, an involuntary, rhythmic, oscillatory movement of a body part, is the most common movement disorder encountered in clinical practice. Rest tremors occur in a body part that is relaxed and completely supported against gravity. Action tremors occur with voluntary contraction of a ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2011/0315/p697.html

Dizziness: A Diagnostic Approach - American Family Physician

Aug 15, 2010 - Dizziness accounts for an estimated 5 percent of primary care clinic visits. The patient history can generally classify dizziness into one of four categories: vertigo, disequilibrium, presyncope, or lightheadedness. The main causes of vertigo are benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2010/0815/p361.html

Dizziness: Approach to Evaluation and Management - American Family Physician

Feb 1, 2017 - Dizziness is a common yet imprecise symptom. It was traditionally divided into four categories based on the patient’s history: vertigo, presyncope, disequilibrium, and light-headedness. However, the distinction between these symptoms is of limited clinical usefulness. Patients have ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2017/0201/p154.html

Early Diagnosis of Dementia - American Family Physician

Feb 15, 2001 - Until recently, the most significant issue facing a family physician regarding the diagnosis and treatment of dementia was ruling out delirium and potentially treatable etiologies. However, as more treatment options become available, it will become increasingly important to diagnose ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2001/0215/p703.html

Efficient Identification of Adults with Depression and Dementia - American Family ...

Sep 15, 2004 - Family physicians must decide how to screen for depression or dementia and which patients to screen. Mental health questionnaires can be helpful. In practice-based screening, questionnaires are administered to all patients, regardless of risk status. In case-finding screening, ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2004/0915/p1101.html

Epidural Analgesia During Labor - American Family Physician

Nov 15, 1998 - Epidural analgesia is a commonly employed technique of providing pain relief during labor. The number of parturients given intrapartum epidural analgesia is reported to be over 50 percent at many institutions in the United States. The procedure has few contraindications, the primary ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1998/1115/p1785.html

Epilepsy in Women - American Family Physician

Oct 15, 2002 - Epilepsy in women raises special reproductive and general health concerns. Seizure frequency and severity may change at puberty, over the menstrual cycle, with pregnancy, and at menopause. Estrogen is known to increase the risk of seizures, while progesterone has an inhibitory effect. ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2002/1015/p1489.html

Epilepsy: Treatment Options - American Family Physician

Jul 15, 2017 - The occurrence of a single seizure does not always require initiation of antiepileptic drugs. Risk of recurrent seizures should guide their use. In adults, key risk factors for recurrence are two unprovoked seizures occurring more than 24 hours apart, epileptiform abnormalities on ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2017/0715/p87.html

Evaluation and Management of Delirium in Hospitalized Older Patients - American Family ...

Dec 1, 2008 - Delirium is common in hospitalized older patients and may be a symptom of a medical emergency, such as hypoxia or hypoglycemia. It is characterized by an acute change in cognition and attention, although the symptoms may be subtle and usually fluctuate throughout the day. This ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2008/1201/p1265.html

Evaluation and Management of Orthostatic Hypotension - American Family Physician

Sep 1, 2011 - Orthostatic hypotension is defined as a decrease in systolic blood pressure of 20 mm Hg or a decrease in diastolic blood pressure of 10 mm Hg within three minutes of standing when compared with blood pressure from the sitting or supine position. It results from an inadequate physiologic...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2011/0901/p527.html

Evaluation and Prevention of Diabetic Neuropathy - American Family Physician

Jun 1, 2005 - Diabetic neuropathy is a debilitating disorder that occurs in nearly 50 percent of patients with diabetes. It is a late finding in type 1 diabetes but can be an early finding in type 2 diabetes. The primary types of diabetic neuropathy are sensorimotor and autonomic. Patients may ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2005/0601/p2123.html

Evaluation and Treatment of the Child with Febrile Seizure - American Family Physician

May 15, 2006 - Up to 5 percent of children in North America and western Europe experience at least one episode of febrile seizure before six years of age. Most of these seizures are self-limited and patients do not require treatment. Continuous therapy after the seizure is not effective in reducing ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2006/0515/p1761.html

Evaluation of a First Seizure - American Family Physician

May 1, 2007 - Seizure is a common presentation in the emergency care setting, and new-onset epilepsy is the most common cause of unprovoked seizures. The patient history and physical examination should direct the type and timing of laboratory and imaging studies. No single sign, symptom, or test ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2007/0501/p1342.html

Evaluation of Acute Headaches in Adults - American Family Physician

Feb 15, 2001 - Classifying headaches as primary (migraine, tension-type or cluster) or secondary can facilitate evaluation and management A detailed headache history helps to distinguish among the primary headache disorders.

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2001/0215/p685.html

Evaluation of First Nonfebrile Seizures - American Family Physician

Aug 15, 2012 - Nonfebrile seizures may indicate underlying disease or epilepsy. The patient history can often distinguish epileptic seizures from nonepileptic disorders by identifying the events directly preceding the convulsion, associated conditions, and details of the seizure, including triggers, ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2012/0815/p334.html

Evaluation of Suspected Dementia - American Family Physician

Mar 15, 2018 - Dementia is a significant and costly health condition that affects 5 million adults and is the fifth leading cause of death among Americans older than 65 years. The prevalence of dementia will likely increase in the future because the number of Americans older than 65 years is expected ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2018/0315/p398.html

Evaluation of Suspected Dementia - American Family Physician

Oct 15, 2011 - As the proportion of persons in the United States older than 65 years increases, the prevalence of dementia will increase as well. Risk factors for dementia include age, family history of dementia, apolipoprotein E4 genotype, cardiovascular comorbidities, chronic anticholinergic use, ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2011/1015/p895.html

Evaluation of Syncope - American Family Physician

Sep 15, 2011 - Syncope is a transient and abrupt loss of consciousness with complete return to preexisting neurologic function. It is classified as neurally mediated (i.e., carotid sinus hypersensitivity, situational, or vasovagal), cardiac, orthostatic, or neurogenic. Older adults are more likely to ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2011/0915/p640.html

Evaluation of the Patient with Muscle Weakness - American Family Physician

Apr 1, 2005 - Muscle weakness is a common complaint among patients presenting to family physicians. Diagnosis begins with a patient history distinguishing weakness from fatigue or asthenia, separate conditions with different etiologies that can coexist with, or be confused for, weakness. The pattern ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2005/0401/p1327.html

Febrile Seizures: Risks, Evaluation, and Prognosis - American Family Physician

Apr 1, 2019 - A febrile seizure is a seizure occurring in a child six months to five years of age that is accompanied by a fever (100.4°F or greater) without central nervous system infection. Febrile seizures are classified as simple or complex. A complex seizure lasts 15 minutes or more, is ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2019/0401/p445.html

Febrile Seizures: Risks, Evaluation, and Prognosis - American Family Physician

Jan 15, 2012 - Febrile seizures are common in the first five years of life, and many factors that increase seizure risk have been identified. Initial evaluation should determine whether features of a complex seizure are present and identify the source of fever. Routine blood tests, neuroimaging, and ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2012/0115/p149.html

Fibromyalgia - American Family Physician

Jul 15, 2007 - Fibromyalgia is an idiopathic, chronic, nonarticular pain syndrome with generalized tender points. It is a multisystem disease characterized by sleep disturbance, fatigue, headache, morning stiffness, paresthesias, and anxiety. Nearly 2 percent of the general population in the United ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2007/0715/p247.html

Frontotemporal Dementia: A Review for Primary Care Physicians - American Family Physician

Dec 1, 2010 - Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is one of the most common forms of dementia in persons younger than 65 years. Variants include behavioral variant FTD, semantic dementia, and progressive nonfluent aphasia. Behavioral and language manifestations are core features of FTD, and patients have ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2010/1201/p1372.html

Gait and Balance Disorders in Older Adults - American Family Physician

Jul 1, 2010 - Gait and balance disorders are common in older adults and are a major cause of falls in this population. They are associated with increased morbidity and mortality, as well as reduced level of function. Common causes include arthritis and orthostatic hypotension; however, most gait and ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2010/0701/p61.html

Guidelines for Managing Alzheimer's Disease: Part I. Assessment - American Family ...

Jun 1, 2002 - Family physicians play a key role in assessing and managing patients with Alzheimer's disease and in linking the families of these patients to supportive services within the community. As part of comprehensive management, the family physician may be responsible for coordinating ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2002/0601/p2263.html

Guidelines for Managing Alzheimer's Disease: Part II. Treatment - American Family ...

Jun 15, 2002 - Once the clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease has been made, a treatment plan must be developed. This plan should include cholinesterase inhibitor therapy to temporarily improve cognition or slow the rate of cognitive decline, management of comorbid conditions, treatment of ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2002/0615/p2525.html

Guillain-Barre Syndrome - American Family Physician

Feb 1, 2013 - Guillain-Barré syndrome consists of a group of neuropathic conditions characterized by progressive weakness and diminished or absent myotatic reflexes. The estimated annual incidence in the United States is 1.65 to 1.79 per 100,000 persons. Guillain-Barré syndrome is believed to result ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2013/0201/p191.html

Guillain-Barre Syndrome - American Family Physician

May 15, 2004 - Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is a group of autoimmune syndromes consisting of demyelinating and acute axonal degenerating forms of the disease. Nerve conduction study helps differentiate the heterogeneous subtypes of GBS. Patients exhibit a progressive paralysis that reaches a plateau ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2004/0515/p2405.html

Headaches in Children and Adolescents - American Family Physician

Feb 15, 2002 - Headaches are common during childhood and become more common and increase in frequency during adolescence. The rational, cost-effective evaluation of children with headache begins with a careful history. The first step is to identify the temporal pattern of the headache--acute, ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2002/0215/p625.html

Herpes Zoster and Postherpetic Neuralgia: Prevention and Management - American Family ...

Nov 15, 2017 - Herpes zoster, or shingles, is caused by reactivation of varicella zoster virus, which causes chickenpox. There are an estimated 1 million cases in the Unites States annually, with an individual lifetime risk of 30%. Patients with conditions that decrease cell-mediated immunity are 20 ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2017/1115/p656.html

Herpes Zoster and Postherpetic Neuralgia: Prevention and Management - American Family ...

Jun 15, 2011 - Herpes zoster (shingles) is diagnosed clinically by recognition of the distinctive, painful vesicular rash appearing in a unilateral, dermatomal distribution. An estimated 1 million cases occur in the United States each year, and increasing age is the primary risk factor. Laboratory ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2011/0615/p1432.html

Herpes Zoster and Postherpetic Neuralgia: Prevention and Management - American Family ...

Sep 15, 2005 - The recognizable appearance and the dermatomal distribution of herpes zoster lesions usually enable a clinical diagnosis to be made easily. Herpes zoster and postherpetic neuralgia occur mainly in older patients. The role of the varicella vaccine in preventing herpes zoster is ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2005/0915/p1075.html

Infant Botulism - American Family Physician

Apr 1, 2002 - Although the worldwide incidence of infant botulism is rare, the majority of cases are diagnosed in the United States. An infant can acquire botulism by ingesting Clostridium botulinum spores, which are found in soil or honey products. The spores germinate into bacteria that colonize ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2002/0401/p1388.html

Infiltrative Anesthesia in Office Practice - American Family Physician

Jun 15, 2014 - When choosing an infiltrative anesthetic agent, the type of procedure, the length of time required for anesthesia, and the pharmacodynamics of each medication are important considerations. Distraction techniques and buffering with sodium bicarbonate can be used to decrease the pain ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2014/0615/p956.html

Initial Evaluation of the Patient with Suspected Dementia - American Family Physician

May 1, 2005 - Dementia is a common disorder among older persons, and projections indicate that the number of patients with dementia in the United States will continue to grow. Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia account for the majority of cases of dementia. After a thorough history and ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2005/0501/p1745.html

Initial Evaluation of Vertigo - American Family Physician

Jan 15, 2006 - Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, acute vestibular neuronitis, and Meniere's disease cause most cases of vertigo; however, family physicians must consider other causes including cerebrovascular disease, migraine, psychological disease, perilymphatic fistulas, multiple sclerosis, and...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2006/0115/p244.html

Intracranial Aneurysms: Current Evidence and Clinical Practice - American Family Physician

Aug 15, 2002 - Unruptured intracranial aneurysms occur in up to 6 percent of the general population. Most persons with these aneurysms remain asymptomatic and are usually unaware of their presence. Risk factors for the formation of aneurysms include a family history of aneurysm, various inherited ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2002/0815/p601.html

Management of Cluster Headache - American Family Physician

Feb 15, 2005 - Cluster headache, an excruciating, unilateral headache usually accompanied by conjunctival injection and lacrimation, can occur episodically or chronically, and can be difficult to treat. Existing effective treatments may be underused because of underdiagnosis of the syndrome. Oxygen ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2005/0215/p717.html

Management of Head and Neck Injuries by the Sideline Physician - American Family Physician

Oct 15, 2006 - Injuries to the head and neck are common in sports. Sideline physicians must be attentive and prepared with an organized approach to detect and manage these injuries. Because head and neck injuries often occur simultaneously, the sideline physician can combine the head and neck ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2006/1015/p1357.html

Management of Herpes Zoster (Shingles) and Postherpetic Neuralgia - American Family ...

Apr 15, 2000 - Herpes zoster (commonly referred to as

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2000/0415/p2437.html

Management of Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus - American Family Physician

Sep 15, 2004 - Gait instability, urinary incontinence, and dementia are the signs and symptoms typically found in patients who have normal pressure hydrocephalus. Estimated to cause no more than 5 percent of cases of dementia, normal pressure hydrocephalus often is treatable, and accurate recognition ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2004/0915/p1071.html

Management of Seizures and Epilepsy - American Family Physician

Apr 1, 1998 - While the evaluation and treatment of patients with seizures or epilepsy is often challenging, modern therapy provides many patients with complete seizure control. After a first seizure, evaluation should focus on excluding an underlying neurologic or medical condition, assessing the ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1998/0401/p1589.html

Management of Status Epilepticus - American Family Physician

Aug 1, 2003 - Status epilepticus is an increasingly recognized public health problem in the United States. Status epilepticus is associated with a high mortality rate that is largely contingent on the duration of the condition before initial treatment, the etiology of the condition, and the age of ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2003/0801/p469.html

Managing Pain in the Dying Patient - American Family Physician

Feb 1, 2000 - End-of-life care can be a challenge requiring the full range of a family physician's skills. Significant pain is common but is often undertreated despite available medications and technology. Starting with an appropriate assessment and following recommended guidelines on the use of ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2000/0201/p755.html

Manipulative Therapies: What Works - American Family Physician

Feb 15, 2019 - Manipulative therapies include osteopathic manipulative treatment and many other forms of manual therapies used to manage a variety of conditions in adults and children. Spinal manipulative therapy may provide short-term improvement in patients with acute or chronic low back pain, ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2019/0215/p248.html

Mechanical Low Back Pain - American Family Physician

Oct 1, 2018 - Low back pain is usually nonspecific or mechanical. Mechanical low back pain arises intrinsically from the spine, intervertebral disks, or surrounding soft tissues. Clinical clues, or red flags, may help identify cases of nonmechanical low back pain and prompt further evaluation or ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2018/1001/p421.html

Medications for Migraine Prophylaxis - American Family Physician

Jan 1, 2006 - Sufficient evidence and consensus exist to recommend propranolol, timolol, amitriptyline, divalproex, sodium valproate, and topiramate as first-line agents for migraine prevention. There is fair evidence of effectiveness with gabapentin and naproxen sodium. Botulinum toxin also has ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2006/0101/p72.html

Methadone Treatment for Pain States - American Family Physician

Apr 1, 2005 - Methadone is a synthetic opioid with potent analgesic effects. Although it is associated commonly with the treatment of opioid addiction, it may be prescribed by licensed family physicians for analgesia. Methadone's unique pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics make it a valuable option ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2005/0401/p1353.html

Migraine Headache Prophylaxis - American Family Physician

Jan 1, 2019 - Migraines impose significant health and financial burdens. Approximately 38% of patients with episodic migraines would benefit from preventive therapy, but less than 13% take prophylactic medications. Preventive medication therapy reduces migraine frequency, severity, and ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2019/0101/p17.html

Mind-Body Therapies for Headache - American Family Physician

Nov 15, 2007 - Headache is one of the most common and enigmatic problems encountered by family physicians. Headache is not a singular entity, and different pathologic mechanisms are involved in distinct types of headache. Most types of headache involve dysfunction of peripheral or central nociceptive ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2007/1115/p1518.html

Multiple Sclerosis: A Primary Care Perspective - American Family Physician

Nov 1, 2014 - Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common permanently disabling disorder of the central nervous system in young adults. Relapsing remitting MS is the most common type, and typical symptoms include sensory disturbances, Lhermitte sign, motor weakness, optic neuritis, impaired ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2014/1101/p644.html

Neurologic Complications of Prostate Cancer - American Family Physician

May 1, 2002 - Neurologic complications continue to pose problems in patients with metastatic prostate cancer. From 15 to 30 percent of metastases are the result of prostate cancer cells traveling through Batson's plexus to the lumbar spine. Metastatic disease in the lumbar area can cause spinal cord ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2002/0501/p1834.html

Neurological Complications of Scuba Diving - American Family Physician

Jun 1, 2001 - Recreational scuba diving has become a popular sport in the United States, with almost 9 million certified divers. When severe diving injury occurs, the nervous system is frequently involved. In dive-related barotrauma, compressed or expanding gas within the ears, sinuses and lungs ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2001/0601/p2211.html

Neurological Complications of Systemic Cancer - American Family Physician

Feb 15, 1999 - Neurologic complications occur frequently in patients with cancer. After routine chemotherapy, these complications are the most common reason for hospitalization of these patients. Brain metastases are the most prevalent complication, affecting 20 to 40 percent of cancer patients and ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1999/0215/p878.html

Neuropsychological Evaluation in Primary Care - American Family Physician

Sep 1, 2010 - Referring a patient to a neuropsychologist for evaluation provides a level of rigorous assessment of brain function that often cannot be obtained in other ways. The neuropsychologist integrates information from the patient’s medical history, laboratory tests, and imaging studies; an ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2010/0901/p495.html

Neuropsychological Evaluations in Adults - American Family Physician

Jan 15, 2019 - Neuropsychologists provide detailed assessments of cognitive and emotional functioning that often cannot be obtained through other diagnostic means. They use standardized assessment tools and integrate the findings with other data to determine whether cognitive decline has occurred, to ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2019/0115/p101.html

New Concepts In Acute Pain Therapy: Preemptive Analgesia - American Family Physician

May 15, 2001 - Pain, which is often inadequately treated, accompanies the more than 23 million surgical procedures performed each year and may persist long after tissue heals. Preemptive analgesia, an evolving clinical concept, involves the introduction of an analgesic regimen before the onset of ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2001/0515/p1979.html

New Drugs for Alzheimer's Disease - American Family Physician

Oct 1, 1998 - Alzheimer's disease is characterized by degeneration of various structures in the brain, with development of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Deficiencies of acetylcholine and other neurotransmitters also occur. Pharmacologic treatment of the disease generally seeks to ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1998/1001/p1175.html

Page  1 2 Next

25 50 100 results per page