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Pleuritic Chest Pain: Sorting Through the Differential Diagnosis - American Family ...

Sep 1, 2017 - Pleuritic chest pain is characterized by sudden and intense sharp, stabbing, or burning pain in the chest when inhaling and exhaling. Pulmonary embolism is the most common serious cause, found in 5% to 21% of patients who present to an emergency department with pleuritic chest pain. A ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2017/0901/p306.html

A Stepwise Approach to the Interpretation of Pulmonary Function Tests - American Family...

Mar 1, 2014 - Office-based pulmonary function testing, also known as spirometry, is a powerful tool for primary care physicians to diagnose and manage respiratory problems. An obstructive defect is indicated by a low forced expiratory volume in one second/forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC) ratio, which...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2014/0301/p359.html

Insomnia: Pharmacologic Therapy - American Family Physician

Jul 1, 2017 - Insomnia accounts for more than 5.5 million visits to family physicians each year. Although behavioral interventions are the mainstay of treatment, pharmacologic therapy may be necessary for some patients. Understanding the risks and benefits of insomnia medications is critical. ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2017/0701/p29.html

Chronic Cough: Evaluation and Management - American Family Physician

Nov 1, 2017 - Although chronic cough in adults (cough lasting longer than eight weeks) can be caused by many etiologies, four conditions account for most cases: upper airway cough syndrome, gastroesophageal reflux disease/laryngopharyngeal reflux disease, asthma, and nonasthmatic eosinophilic ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2017/1101/p575.html

Diagnosis and Management of Sarcoidosis - American Family Physician

May 15, 2016 - Sarcoidosis is a systemic disease of unknown etiology characterized by the presence of noncaseating granulomas in any organ, most commonly the lungs and intrathoracic lymph nodes. A diagnosis of sarcoidosis should be suspected in any young or middle-aged adult presenting with ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2016/0515/p840.html

Management of Acute Asthma Exacerbations - American Family Physician

Jul 1, 2011 - Asthma exacerbations can be classified as mild, moderate, severe, or life threatening. Criteria for exacerbation severity are based on symptoms and physical examination parameters, as well as lung function and oxygen saturation. In patients with a peak expiratory flow of 50 to 79 ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2011/0701/p40.html

Newborn Respiratory Distress - American Family Physician

Dec 1, 2015 - Newborn respiratory distress presents a diagnostic and management challenge. Newborns with respiratory distress commonly exhibit tachypnea with a respiratory rate of more than 60 respirations per minute. They may present with grunting, retractions, nasal flaring, and cyanosis. Common ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2015/1201/p994.html

Evaluation of the Solitary Pulmonary Nodule - American Family Physician

Dec 15, 2015 - A solitary pulmonary nodule is a common radiologic finding that is often discovered incidentally and may require significant workup to establish a definitive diagnosis. A solitary pulmonary nodule is a well-circumscribed round lesion measuring up to 3 cm in diameter and surrounded by ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2015/1215/p1084.html

Common Occupational Disorders: Asthma, COPD, Dermatitis, and Musculoskeletal Disorders ...

Jun 15, 2016 - An occupational illness is an event or exposure that occurs in the workplace that causes or contributes to a condition or worsens a preexisting condition. If an occupational disorder is suspected, a directed history should be taken with particular attention to establishing a temporal ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2016/0615/p1000.html

Pulmonary Hypertension: Diagnosis and Treatment - American Family Physician

Sep 15, 2016 - Pulmonary hypertension is a common, complex group of disorders that result from different pathophysiologic mechanisms but are all defined by a mean pulmonary arterial pressure of 25 mm Hg or greater. Patients often initially present to family physicians; however, because the symptoms ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2016/0915/p463.html

Hemoptysis: Evaluation and Management - American Family Physician

Feb 15, 2015 - Hemoptysis is the expectoration of blood from the lung parenchyma or airways. The initial step in the evaluation is determining the origin of bleeding. Pseudohemoptysis is identified through the history and physical examination. In adults, acute respiratory tract infections (e.g., ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2015/0215/p243.html

Diagnostic Approach to Pleural Effusion - American Family Physician

Jul 15, 2014 - Pleural effusion affects more than 1.5 million people in the United States each year and often complicates the management of heart failure, pneumonia, and malignancy. Pleural effusion occurs when fluid collects between the parietal and visceral pleura. Processes causing a distortion in ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2014/0715/p99.html

Nonpharmacologic Management of Chronic Insomnia - American Family Physician

Dec 15, 2015 - Insomnia affects 10% to 30% of the population with a total cost of $92.5 to $107.5 billion annually. Short-term, chronic, and other types of insomnia are the three major categories according to the International Classification of Sleep Disorders, 3rd ed. The criteria for diagnosis are ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2015/1215/p1058.html

Diagnosis and Treatment of Community-Acquired Pneumonia - American Family Physician

Feb 1, 2006 - Patients with community-acquired pneumonia often present with cough, fever, chills, fatigue, dyspnea, rigors, and pleuritic chest pain. When a patient presents with suspected community-acquired pneumonia, the physician should first assess the need for hospitalization using a mortality ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2006/0201/p442.html

Evaluation of the Patient with Chronic Cough - American Family Physician

Oct 15, 2011 - Initial evaluation of the patient with chronic cough (i.e., of more than eight weeks’ duration) should include a focused history and physical examination, and in most patients, chest radiography. Patients who are taking an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor should switch to a ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2011/1015/p887.html

Diagnostic Approach to Pleural Effusion in Adults - American Family Physician

Apr 1, 2006 - The first step in the evaluation of patients with pleural effusion is to determine whether the effusion is a transudate or an exudate. An exudative effusion is diagnosed if the patient meets Light's criteria. The serum to pleural fluid protein or albumin gradients may help better ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2006/0401/p1211.html

Diagnosis of Deep Venous Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolism - American Family Physician

Nov 15, 2012 - Venous thromboembolism manifests as deep venous thrombosis (DVT) or pulmonary embolism, and has a mortality rate of 6 to 12 percent. Well-validated clinical prediction rules are available to determine the pretest probability of DVT and pulmonary embolism. When the likelihood of DVT is ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2012/1115/p913.html

Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection in Children - American Family Physician

Jan 15, 2011 - Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is an RNA virus that causes respiratory tract infections in children. In the North- ern Hemisphere, the peak infection season is November through April. By two years of age, most children will have had an RSV infection. Bronchiolitis, a lower ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2011/0115/p141.html

Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction: Diagnosis and Management - American Family Physician

Aug 15, 2011 - Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction describes the narrowing of the airway that occurs with exercise. More than 10 percent of the general population and up to 90 percent of persons previously diagnosed with asthma have exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. Common symptoms include ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2011/0815/p427.html

Hemoptysis: Diagnosis and Management - American Family Physician

Oct 1, 2005 - Hemoptysis is the spitting of blood that originated in the lungs or bronchial tubes. The patient's history should help determine the amount of blood and differentiate between hemoptysis, pseudohemoptysis, and hematemesis. A focused physical examination can lead to the diagnosis in most ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2005/1001/p1253.html

An Approach to Interpreting Spirometry - American Family Physician

Mar 1, 2004 - Spirometry is a powerful tool that can be used to detect, follow, and manage patients with lung disorders. Technology advancements have made spirometry much more reliable and relatively simple to incorporate into a routine office visit. However, interpreting spirometry results can be ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2004/0301/p1107.html

Pleurisy - American Family Physician

May 1, 2007 - Pleuritic chest pain is a common presenting symptom and has many causes, which range from life-threatening to benign, self-limited conditions. Pulmonary embolism is the most common potentially life-threatening cause, found in 5 to 20 percent of patients who present to the emergency ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2007/0501/p1357.html

Respiratory Distress in the Newborn - American Family Physician

Oct 1, 2007 - The most common etiology of neonatal respiratory distress is transient tachypnea of the newborn; this is triggered by excessive lung fluid, and symptoms usually resolve spontaneously. Respiratory distress syndrome can occur in premature infants as a result of surfactant deficiency and ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2007/1001/p987.html

Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension: An Update on Diagnosis and Treatment - American Family...

Aug 15, 2010 - Pulmonary arterial hypertension is defined as a mean pulmonary arterial pressure greater than 25 mm Hg at rest or 30 mm Hg during physical activity. Pulmonary arterial hypertension is classified into subgroups, including idiopathic, heritable, and pulmonary arterial hypertension ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2010/0815/p370.html

Evaluation of the Solitary Pulmonary Nodule - American Family Physician

Oct 15, 2009 - Solitary pulmonary nodules are common radiologic findings, typically discovered incidentally through chest radiography or computed tomography of the neck, chest, and abdomen. Primary care physicians must decide how to pursue an evaluation of a nodule once it has been identified. The ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2009/1015/p827.html

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