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Herpes Zoster and Postherpetic Neuralgia: Prevention and Management - American Family ...

Jun 15, 2011 - Herpes zoster (shingles) is diagnosed clinically by recognition of the distinctive, painful vesicular rash appearing in a unilateral, dermatomal distribution. An estimated 1 million cases occur in the United States each year, and increasing age is the primary risk factor. Laboratory ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2011/0615/p1432.html

Herpes Zoster and Postherpetic Neuralgia: Prevention and Management - American Family ...

Sep 15, 2005 - The recognizable appearance and the dermatomal distribution of herpes zoster lesions usually enable a clinical diagnosis to be made easily. Herpes zoster and postherpetic neuralgia occur mainly in older patients. The role of the varicella vaccine in preventing herpes zoster is ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2005/0915/p1075.html

Lowering the Age for Routine Influenza Vaccination to 50 Years: AAFP Leads the Nation ...

Nov 1, 1999 - The American Academy of Family Physicians now recommends that all persons 50 years of age and older receive an annual influenza vaccination, because the rates of morbidity and mortality associated with influenza are high and vaccination is cost-effective. Reasons for lowering the ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1999/1101/p2061.html

Poliovirus Vaccine Options - American Family Physician

Jan 1, 1999 - As a result of the success of immunization, indigenous wild poliomyelitis has disappeared from the United States. Of 142 confirmed cases of paralytic poliomyelitis reported in the United States from 1980 to 1996, 134 were classified as vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis (VAPP). ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1999/0101/p113.html

Prevention of Malaria in Travelers - American Family Physician

May 15, 2012 - There are approximately 300 million cases of malaria each year, resulting in 1 million deaths worldwide. Family physicians often encounter patients preparing to travel to malaria-endemic regions. Physicians should have basic knowledge of parasite transmission and malaria prevention. The...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2012/0515/p973.html

Prevention of Malaria in Travelers - American Family Physician

Aug 1, 2003 - Malaria is a major international public health problem, responsible for considerable morbidity and mortality around the world each year. As travel to tropical locations increases, U.S. physicians are being asked more frequently to provide recommendations for malaria prevention. An ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2003/0801/p509.html

Prevention of Neonatal Group B Streptococcal Infection - American Family Physician

Jun 1, 1998 - Neonatal group B streptococcal infection is the primary cause of neonatal morbidity related to infection. It can often be prevented by identifying and treating pregnant women who carry group B streptococci or who are at highest risk of transmitting the bacteria to newborns. Increasing ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1998/0601/p2713.html

Prevention of Perinatal Group B Streptococcal Disease: Updated CDC Guideline - American...

Jul 1, 2012 - Group B streptococcus is the leading cause of early-onset neonatal sepsis in the United States. Universal screening is recommended for pregnant women at 35 to 37 weeks’ gestation. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently updated its guideline for the prevention of ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2012/0701/p59.html

Preventive Health Care for Men Who Have Sex with Men - American Family Physician

Jun 15, 2015 - Men who have sex with men (MSM) comprise at least 4% of males in the United States. MSM may describe themselves as gay, bisexual, or heterosexual. Because current medical practice does not always facilitate discussion of sexual behaviors, this group of men may face barriers to receiving...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2015/0615/p844.html

The Pretravel Consultation - American Family Physician

Oct 15, 2016 - Key components of the pretravel consultation include intake questions regarding the traveler’s anticipated itinerary and medical history; immunizations; malaria prophylaxis; and personal protection measures against arthropod bites, traveler’s diarrhea, and injury. Most vaccinations that...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2016/1015/p620.html

Travel Immunizations - American Family Physician

Jul 1, 2004 - Advising travelers on vaccine-preventable illnesses is increasingly becoming the responsibility of primary care physicians. The approach to vaccine recommendations should be based on a thorough assessment of the risks for travel-related diseases, the time available before trip ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2004/0701/p89.html

Travel Medicine: Helping Patients Prepare for Trips Abroad - American Family Physician

Aug 1, 1998 - One third of persons who travel abroad experience a travel-related illness, usually diarrhea or an upper respiratory infection. The risk of travelers' diarrhea can be reduced by eating only freshly prepared, hot foods. Combination therapy with a single dose of ofloxacin plus loperamide ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1998/0801/p383.html

Traveler's Diarrhea - American Family Physician

Jun 1, 2005 - Acute diarrhea affects millions of persons who travel to developing countries each year. Food and water contaminated with fecal matter are the main sources of infection. Bacteria such as enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, enteroaggregative E. coli, Campylobacter, Salmonella, and Shigella...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2005/0601/p2095.html

Vaccine Adverse Events: Separating Myth from Reality - American Family Physician

Jun 15, 2017 - Vaccines are one of the most successful medical advances in modern times. Most vaccine-preventable illnesses are unfamiliar to modern parents. Because of this, parents are increasingly questioning the necessity of immunizing their children, especially because no vaccine is completely ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2017/0615/p786.html

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