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Amenorrhea: Evaluation and Treatment - American Family Physician

Apr 15, 2006 - A thorough history and physical examination as well as laboratory testing can help narrow the differential diagnosis of amenorrhea. In patients with primary amenorrhea, the presence or absence of sexual development should direct the evaluation. Constitutional delay of growth and puberty...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2006/0415/p1374.html

Pharyngitis - American Family Physician

Mar 15, 2004 - Sore throat is one of the most common reasons for visits to family physicians. While most patients with sore throat have an infectious cause (pharyngitis), fewer than 20 percent have a clear indication for antibiotic therapy (i.e., group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal infection). ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2004/0315/p1465.html

Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension: An Update on Diagnosis and Treatment - American Family...

Aug 15, 2010 - Pulmonary arterial hypertension is defined as a mean pulmonary arterial pressure greater than 25 mm Hg at rest or 30 mm Hg during physical activity. Pulmonary arterial hypertension is classified into subgroups, including idiopathic, heritable, and pulmonary arterial hypertension ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2010/0815/p370.html

Treating Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathic Pain - American Family Physician

Jul 15, 2010 - Diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain affects the functionality, mood, and sleep patterns of approximately 10 to 20 percent of patients with diabetes mellitus. Treatment goals include restoring function and improving pain control. Patients can realistically expect a 30 to 50 percent ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2010/0715/p151.html

Hyperbilirubinemia in the Term Newborn - American Family Physician

Feb 15, 2002 - Hyperbilirubinemia is one of the most common problems encountered in term newborns. Historically, management guidelines were derived from studies on bilirubin toxicity in infants with hemolytic disease. More recent recommendations support the use of less intensive therapy in healthy ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2002/0215/p599.html

Approach to the Adult Patient with Fever of Unknown Origin - American Family Physician

Dec 1, 2003 - Fever of unknown origin (FUO) in adults is defined as a temperature higher than 38.3 degrees C (100.9 degrees F) that lasts for more than three weeks with no obvious source despite appropriate investigation. The four categories of potential etiology of FUO are classic, nosocomial, ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2003/1201/p2223.html

Acute Pancreatitis: Diagnosis, Prognosis, and Treatment - American Family Physician

May 15, 2007 - Mild acute pancreatitis has a low mortality rate, but patients with severe acute pancreatitis are more likely to develop complications and have a much higher death rate. Although serum amylase and lipase levels remain the most widely used diagnostic assays for acute pancreatitis, other ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2007/0515/p1513.html

Management of Staphylococcus aureus Infections - American Family Physician

Dec 15, 2005 - Because of high incidence, morbidity, and antimicrobial resistance, Staphylococcus aureus infections are a growing concern for family physicians. Strains of S. aureus that are resistant to vancomycin are now recognized. Increasing incidence of unrecognized community-acquired ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2005/1215/p2474.html

A Practical Approach to Neonatal Jaundice - American Family Physician

May 1, 2008 - Kernicterus and neurologic sequelae caused by severe neonatal hyperbilirubinemia are preventable conditions. A structured and practical approach to the identification and care of infants with jaundice can facilitate prevention, thus decreasing rates of morbidity and mortality. Primary ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2008/0501/p1255.html

Trigeminal Neuralgia - American Family Physician

May 1, 2008 - Trigeminal neuralgia is an uncommon disorder characterized by recurrent attacks of lancinating pain in the trigeminal nerve distribution. Typically, brief attacks are triggered by talking, chewing, teeth brushing, shaving, a light touch, or even a cool breeze. The pain is nearly always ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2008/0501/p1291.html

Managing Hypertension Using Combination Therapy - American Family Physician

May 1, 2008 - Combination therapy of hypertension with separate agents or a fixed-dose combination pill offers the potential to lower blood pressure more quickly, obtain target blood pressure, and decrease adverse effects. Antihypertensive agents from different classes may offset adverse reactions ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2008/0501/p1279.html

Diagnosis and Management of Ectopic Pregnancy - American Family Physician

Nov 1, 2005 - Ectopic pregnancy is a high-risk condition that occurs in 1.9 percent of reported pregnancies. The condition is the leading cause of pregnancy-related death in the first trimester. If a woman of reproductive age presents with abdominal pain, vaginal bleeding, syncope, or hypotension, ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2005/1101/p1707.html

Diagnosis and Treatment of Bladder Cancer - American Family Physician

Oct 1, 2009 - Bladder cancer is the sixth most prevalent malignancy in the United States. The most common type of bladder cancer is urothelial (transitional cell) carcinoma, and cystoscopy remains the mainstay of diagnosis and surveillance. Fluorescence cystoscopy offers improvement in the detection ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2009/1001/p717.html

Lymphadenopathy and Malignancy - American Family Physician

Dec 1, 2002 - The majority of patients presenting with peripheral lymphadenopathy have easily identifiable causes that are benign or self-limited. Among primary care patients presenting with lymphadenopathy, the prevalence of malignancy has been estimated to be as low as 1.1 percent. The critical ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2002/1201/p2103.html

Update on ASCCP Consensus Guidelines for Abnormal Cervical Screening Tests and Cervical...

Jul 15, 2009 - New data have emerged since publication of the American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology's 2001 consensus guidelines for management of abnormal cervical cytology and histology. The 2006 guidelines include recommendations for special populations (i.e., adolescents and ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2009/0715/p147.html

Cirrhosis and Chronic Liver Failure: Part I. Diagnosis and Evaluation - American Family...

Sep 1, 2006 - Cirrhosis and chronic liver failure are leading causes of morbidity and mortality in the United States, with the majority of preventable cases attributed to excessive alcohol consumption, viral hepatitis, or nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Cirrhosis often is an indolent disease; most ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2006/0901/p756.html

Treatment Options for Insomnia - American Family Physician

Aug 15, 2007 - The frequency of sleep disruption and the degree to which insomnia significantly affects daytime function determine the need for evaluation and treatment. Physicians may initiate treatment of insomnia at an initial visit; for patients with a clear acute stressor such as grief, no ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2007/0815/p517.html

Acute Stroke Diagnosis - American Family Physician

Jul 1, 2009 - Stroke can be categorized as ischemic stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage, and subarachnoid hemorrhage. Awakening with or experiencing the abrupt onset of focal neurologic deficits is the hallmark of ischemic stroke diagnosis. The most common presenting symptoms for ischemic stroke are ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2009/0701/p33.html

Evaluation and Treatment of Enuresis - American Family Physician

Aug 15, 2008 - Enuresis is defined as repeated, spontaneous voiding of urine during sleep in a child five years or older. It affects 5 to 7 million children in the United States. Primary nocturnal enuresis is caused by a disparity between bladder capacity and nocturnal urine production and failure of ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2008/0815/p489.html

Evaluation of the Solitary Pulmonary Nodule - American Family Physician

Oct 15, 2009 - Solitary pulmonary nodules are common radiologic findings, typically discovered incidentally through chest radiography or computed tomography of the neck, chest, and abdomen. Primary care physicians must decide how to pursue an evaluation of a nodule once it has been identified. The ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2009/1015/p827.html

Management of Spontaneous Abortion - American Family Physician

Oct 1, 2005 - Spontaneous abortion, which is the loss of a pregnancy without outside intervention before 20 weeks' gestation, affects up to 20 percent of recognized pregnancies. Spontaneous abortion can be subdivided into threatened abortion, inevitable abortion, incomplete abortion, missed abortion,...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2005/1001/p1243.html

Evaluation and Treatment of Constipation in Infants and Children - American Family ...

Feb 1, 2006 - Constipation in children usually is functional and the result of stool retention. However, family physicians must be alert for red flags that may indicate the presence of an uncommon but serious organic cause of constipation, such as Hirschsprung's disease (congenital aganglionic ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2006/0201/p469.html

Hyperthyroidism: Diagnosis and Treatment - American Family Physician

Aug 15, 2005 - The proper treatment of hyperthyroidism depends on recognition of the signs and symptoms of the disease and determination of the etiology. The most common cause of hyperthyroidism is Graves' disease. Other common causes include thyroiditis, toxic multinodular goiter, toxic adenomas, and...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2005/0815/p623.html

The Adult Neck Mass - American Family Physician

Sep 1, 2002 - Family physicians frequently encounter neck masses in adult patients. A careful medical history should be obtained, and a thorough physical examination should be performed. The patient's age and the location, size, and duration of the mass are important pieces of information. ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2002/0901/p831.html

ACC/AHA Guideline Update for the Management of ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial ...

Jun 15, 2009 - The American College of Cardiology and American Heart Association, in collaboration with the Canadian Cardiovascular Society, have issued an update of the 2004 guideline for the management of patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. The American Academy of Family ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2009/0615/p1080.html

Neuropsychological Evaluation in Primary Care - American Family Physician

Sep 1, 2010 - Referring a patient to a neuropsychologist for evaluation provides a level of rigorous assessment of brain function that often cannot be obtained in other ways. The neuropsychologist integrates information from the patient’s medical history, laboratory tests, and imaging studies; an ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2010/0901/p495.html

Postexposure Prophylaxis Against Human Immunodeficiency Virus - American Family Physician

Jul 15, 2010 - Family physicians often encounter situations in which postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) with antiretroviral medications against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) may be indicated. When the exposure source's HIV status is unknown and testing of the source is possible, use of a rapid HIV ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2010/0715/p161.html

Diagnostic Approach to Palpitations - American Family Physician

Feb 15, 2005 - Palpitations-sensations of a rapid or irregular heartbeat-are most often caused by cardiac arrhythmias or anxiety. Most patients with arrhythmias do not complain of palpitations. However, any arrhythmia, including sinus tachycardia, atrial fibrillation, premature ventricular ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2005/0215/p743.html

Acute Abdominal Pain in Children - American Family Physician

Jun 1, 2003 - Acute abdominal pain in children presents a diagnostic dilemma. Although many cases of acute abdominal pain are benign, some require rapid diagnosis and treatment to minimize morbidity. Numerous disorders can cause abdominal pain. The most common medical cause is gastroenteritis, and ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2003/0601/p2321.html

Venous Thromboembolism During Pregnancy - American Family Physician

Jun 15, 2008 - Venous thromboembolism is the leading cause of maternal death in the United States. Pregnancy is a risk factor for deep venous thrombosis, and risk is further increased with a personal or family history of thrombosis or thrombophilia. Screening for thrombophilia is not recommended for ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2008/0615/p1709.html

Treatment of Nursing Home-Acquired Pneumonia - American Family Physician

Jun 1, 2009 - Pneumonia is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in nursing home residents, with 30-day mortality rates ranging from 10 to 30 percent. Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most common cause of nursing home-acquired pneumonia, although Staphylococcus aureus and gram-negative ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2009/0601/p976.html

Geriatric Failure to Thrive - American Family Physician

Jul 15, 2004 - In elderly patients, failure to thrive describes a state of decline that is multifactorial and may be caused by chronic concurrent diseases and functional impairments. Manifestations of this condition include weight loss, decreased appetite, poor nutrition, and inactivity. Four ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2004/0715/p343.html

Nursing Home Care: Part II. Clinical Aspects - American Family Physician

May 15, 2010 - Understanding the distinctions between the management of clinical problems in nursing homes compared with the community setting helps improve the overall care of nursing home residents. Liberalizing diets helps avoid unintentional weight loss in nursing home residents, although the use ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2010/0515/p1229.html

Aortic Stenosis: Diagnosis and Treatment - American Family Physician

Sep 15, 2008 - Aortic stenosis is the most important cardiac valve disease in developed countries, affecting 3 percent of persons older than 65 years. Although the survival rate in asymptomatic patients with aortic stenosis is comparable to that in age- and sex-matched control patients, the average ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2008/0915/p717.html

Management of Blood Glucose in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus - American Family Physician

Jan 1, 2009 - Evidence-based guidelines for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus focus on three areas: intensive lifestyle intervention that includes at least 150 minutes per week of physical activity, weight loss with an initial goal of 7 percent of baseline weight, and a low-fat, ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2009/0101/p29.html

Acute Lumbar Disk Pain: Navigating Evaluation and Treatment Choices - American Family ...

Oct 1, 2008 - Acute lumbar disk herniations are the most common cause of sciatica. After excluding emergent causes, such as cauda equina syndrome, epidural abscess, fracture, or malignancy, a six-week trial of conservative management is indicated. Patients should be advised to stay active. If ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2008/1001/p835.html

Diagnosing the Cause of Chest Pain - American Family Physician

Nov 15, 2005 - Chest pain presents a diagnostic challenge in outpatient family medicine. Noncardiac causes are common, but it is important not to overlook serious conditions such as an acute coronary syndrome, pulmonary embolism, or pneumonia. In addition to a thorough history and physical ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2005/1115/p2012.html

Diagnosis of Acute Abdominal Pain in Older Patients - American Family Physician

Nov 1, 2006 - Acute abdominal pain is a common presenting complaint in older patients. Presentation may differ from that of the younger patient and is often complicated by coexistent disease, delays in presentation, and physical and social barriers. The physical examination can be misleadingly ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2006/1101/p1537.html

Evaluation of Palpable Breast Masses - American Family Physician

May 1, 2005 - Palpable breast masses are common and usually benign, but efficient evaluation and prompt diagnosis are necessary to rule out malignancy. A thorough clinical breast examination, imaging, and tissue sampling are needed for a definitive diagnosis. Fine-needle aspiration is fast, ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2005/0501/p1731.html

Gastrointestinal Complications of Diabetes - American Family Physician

Jun 15, 2008 - Gastrointestinal complications of diabetes include gastroparesis, intestinal enteropathy (which can cause diarrhea, constipation, and fecal incontinence), and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Patients with gastroparesis may present with early satiety, nausea, vomiting, bloating, ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2008/0615/p1697.html

Treatment-Resistant Depression - American Family Physician

Jul 15, 2009 - Up to two thirds of patients with major unipolar depression will not respond to the first medication prescribed. Depression may be considered resistant to treatment when at least two trials with antidepressants from different pharmacologic classes (adequate in dose, duration, and ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2009/0715/p167.html

Lymphadenopathy: Differential Diagnosis and Evaluation - American Family Physician

Oct 15, 1998 - Although the finding of lymphadenopathy sometimes raises fears about serious illness, it is, in patients seen in primary care settings, usually a result of benign infectious causes. Most patients can be diagnosed on the basis of a careful history and physical examination. Localized ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1998/1015/p1313.html

Vasomotor Rhinitis - American Family Physician

Sep 15, 2005 - Vasomotor rhinitis affects millions of Americans and results in significant symptomatology. Characterized by a combination of symptoms that includes nasal obstruction and rhinorrhea, vasomotor rhinitis is a diagnosis of exclusion reached after taking a careful history, performing a ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2005/0915/p1057.html

Vitamin B12 Deficiency - American Family Physician

Mar 1, 2003 - Vitamin B12 (cobalamin) deficiency is a common cause of macrocytic anemia and has been implicated in a spectrum of neuropsychiatric disorders. The role of B12 deficiency in hyperhomocysteinemia and the promotion of atherosclerosis is only now being explored. Diagnosis of vitamin B12 ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2003/0301/p979.html

Ulcerative Colitis: Diagnosis and Treatment - American Family Physician

Nov 1, 2007 - Ulcerative colitis is a chronic disease with recurrent symptoms and significant morbidity. The precise etiology is still unknown. As many as 25 percent of patients with ulcerative colitis have extraintestinal manifestations. The diagnosis is made endoscopically. Tests such as ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2007/1101/p1323.html

Evaluation and Management of the Patient with Difficult-to-Control or Resistant ...

May 15, 2009 - High blood pressure is often difficult to control. Resistant hypertension is blood pressure above goal despite adherence to a combination of at least three antihypertensive medications of different classes, optimally dosed and usually including a diuretic. The approach to blood pressure...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2009/0515/p863.html

Spontaneous Vaginal Delivery - American Family Physician

Aug 1, 2008 - Vaginal delivery is a natural process that usually does not require significant medical intervention. Management guided by current knowledge of the relevant screening tests and normal labor process can greatly increase the probability of an uncomplicated delivery and postpartum course. ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2008/0801/p336.html

Eosinophilic Esophagitis: A Mimic of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease - Editorials - ...

May 15, 2018 - Pathologic diseases, besides GERD, are becoming more prevalent and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with symptoms of esophageal dysfunction.

American Family Physician : Editorials

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2018/0515/p628.html

Hemolytic Anemia - American Family Physician

Jun 1, 2004 - Hemolysis presents as acute or chronic anemia, reticulocytosis, or jaundice. The diagnosis is established by reticulocytosis, increased unconjugated bilirubin and lactate dehydrogenase, decreased haptoglobin, and peripheral blood smear findings. Premature destruction of erythrocytes ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2004/0601/p2599.html

Identification and Management of Latent Tuberculosis Infection - American Family Physician

May 15, 2009 - Latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is a condition in which a person is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, but does not currently have active tuberculosis disease. An estimated 10 to 15 million persons in the United States have LTBI. Because 5 to 10 percent of persons with LTBI ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2009/0515/p879.html

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