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Approach to Acute Headache in Adults - American Family Physician

May 15, 2013 - Approximately one-half of the adult population worldwide is affected by a headache disorder. The International Headache Society classification and diagnostic criteria can help physicians differentiate primary headaches (e.g., tension, migraine, cluster) from secondary headaches (e.g., ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2013/0515/p682.html

Update on Vitamin B12 Deficiency - American Family Physician

Jun 15, 2011 - Vitamin B12 (cobalamin) deficiency is a common cause of megaloblastic anemia, a variety of neuropsychiatric symp- toms, and elevated serum homocysteine levels, especially in older persons. There are a number of risk factors for vitamin B12 deficiency, including prolonged use of ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2011/0615/p1425.html

Primary Brain Tumors in Adults: Diagnosis and Treatment - American Family Physician

Feb 1, 2016 - Primary intracranial tumors of the brain structures, including meninges, are rare with an overall five-year survival rate of 33.4%; they are collectively called primary brain tumors. Proven risk factors for these tumors include certain genetic syndromes and exposure to high-dose ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2016/0201/p211.html

Peripheral Neuropathy: Differential Diagnosis and Management - American Family Physician

Apr 1, 2010 - Peripheral neuropathy has a variety of systemic, metabolic, and toxic causes. The most common treatable causes include diabetes mellitus, hypothyroidism, and nutritional deficiencies. The diagnosis requires careful clinical assessment, judicious laboratory testing, and electrodiagnostic...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2010/0401/p887.html

Differentiation and Diagnosis of Tremor - American Family Physician

Mar 15, 2011 - Tremor, an involuntary, rhythmic, oscillatory movement of a body part, is the most common movement disorder encountered in clinical practice. Rest tremors occur in a body part that is relaxed and completely supported against gravity. Action tremors occur with voluntary contraction of a ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2011/0315/p697.html

Recognition and Management of Motor Delay and Muscle Weakness in Children - American ...

Jan 1, 2015 - Diagnosis of neuromuscular disorders in young children is often delayed for years after symptoms emerge, resulting in missed opportunities for therapy and genetic counseling. Identification of the weak child begins with careful attention to caregiver concerns and developmental ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2015/0101/p38.html

Treatment of Acute Migraine Headache - American Family Physician

Feb 1, 2011 - Migraine headache is a common and potentially debilitating disorder often treated by family physicians. Before diagnosing migraine, serious intracranial pathology must be ruled out. Treating acute migraine is challenging because of substantial rates of nonresponse to medications and ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2011/0201/p271.html

Peripheral Nerve Entrapment and Injury in the Upper Extremity - American Family Physician

Jan 15, 2010 - Peripheral nerve injury of the upper extremity commonly occurs in patients who participate in recreational (e.g., sports) and occupational activities. Nerve injury should be considered when a patient experiences pain, weakness, or paresthesias in the absence of a known bone, soft ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2010/0115/p147.html

Diagnosis of Acute Stroke - American Family Physician

Apr 15, 2015 - Stroke can be categorized as ischemic stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage, or subarachnoid hemorrhage. Awakening with or experiencing the abrupt onset of focal neurologic deficits is the hallmark of the diagnosis of ischemic stroke. The most common presenting symptoms of ischemic stroke ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2015/0415/p528.html

Pharmacologic Therapy for Acute Pain - American Family Physician

Jun 1, 2013 - The approach to patients with acute pain begins by identifying the underlying cause and a disease-specific treatment. The first-line pharmacologic agent for the symptomatic treatment of mild to moderate pain is acetaminophen or a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). The choice ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2013/0601/p766.html

Behavioral Disorders in Dementia: Appropriate Nondrug Interventions and Antipsychotic ...

Aug 15, 2016 - Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia pose management challenges for caregivers and clinicians. Firstline nonpharmacologic treatments include eliminating physical and emotional stressors, modifying the patient’s environment, and establishing daily routines. Family members ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2016/0815/p276.html

Pituitary Adenomas: An Overview - American Family Physician

Sep 1, 2013 - Prolactinomas and nonfunctioning adenomas are the most common types of pituitary adenomas. Patients with pituitary adenomas may present initially with symptoms of endocrine dysfunction such as infertility, decreased libido, and galactorrhea, or with neurologic symptoms such as headache ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2013/0901/p319.html

Weighing the Risks and Benefits of Chronic Opioid Therapy - American Family Physician

Jun 15, 2016 - Evidence supports the use of opioids for treating acute pain. However, the evidence is limited for the use of chronic opioid therapy for chronic pain. Furthermore, the risks of chronic therapy are significant and may outweigh any potential benefits. When considering chronic opioid ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2016/0615/p982.html

Pharmacologic Management of Pain at the End of Life - American Family Physician

Jul 1, 2014 - Although many patients experience debilitating pain at the end of life, there are many options to improve analgesia and quality of life. Pain assessment using a validated tool, with attention to patient function and specific goals, helps tailor individual treatment plans. The World ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2014/0701/p26.html

Chronic Daily Headache: Diagnosis and Management - American Family Physician

Apr 15, 2014 - Chronic daily headache is defined as the presence of a headache on 15 days or more per month for at least three months. The most common types of chronic daily headache are chronic migraines and chronic tension-type headaches. If a red flag for a secondary cause of headache is present, ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2014/0415/p642.html

Evaluation of Syncope - American Family Physician

Sep 15, 2011 - Syncope is a transient and abrupt loss of consciousness with complete return to preexisting neurologic function. It is classified as neurally mediated (i.e., carotid sinus hypersensitivity, situational, or vasovagal), cardiac, orthostatic, or neurogenic. Older adults are more likely to ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2011/0915/p640.html

Cluster Headache - American Family Physician

Jul 15, 2013 - Cluster headache causes severe unilateral temporal or periorbital pain, lasting 15 to 180 minutes and accompanied by autonomic symptoms in the nose, eyes, and face. Headaches often recur at the same time each day during the cluster period, which can last for weeks to months. Some ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2013/0715/p122.html

Multiple Sclerosis: A Primary Care Perspective - American Family Physician

Nov 1, 2014 - Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common permanently disabling disorder of the central nervous system in young adults. Relapsing remitting MS is the most common type, and typical symptoms include sensory disturbances, Lhermitte sign, motor weakness, optic neuritis, impaired ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2014/1101/p644.html

Infiltrative Anesthesia in Office Practice - American Family Physician

Jun 15, 2014 - When choosing an infiltrative anesthetic agent, the type of procedure, the length of time required for anesthesia, and the pharmacodynamics of each medication are important considerations. Distraction techniques and buffering with sodium bicarbonate can be used to decrease the pain ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2014/0615/p956.html

Transient Ischemic Attack: Part I. Diagnosis and Evaluation - American Family Physician

Sep 15, 2012 - Transient ischemic attack is defined as transient neurologic symptoms without evidence of acute infarction. It is a common and important risk factor for future stroke, but is greatly underreported. Common symptoms are sudden and transient, and include unilateral paresis, speech ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2012/0915/p521.html

Bell's Palsy: Diagnosis and Management - American Family Physician

Oct 1, 2007 - Bell's palsy is a peripheral palsy of the facial nerve that results in muscle weakness on one side of the face. Affected patients develop unilateral facial paralysis over one to three days with forehead involvement and no other neurologic abnormalities. Symptoms typically peak in the ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2007/1001/p997.html

Guillain-Barre Syndrome - American Family Physician

Feb 1, 2013 - Guillain-Barré syndrome consists of a group of neuropathic conditions characterized by progressive weakness and diminished or absent myotatic reflexes. The estimated annual incidence in the United States is 1.65 to 1.79 per 100,000 persons. Guillain-Barré syndrome is believed to result ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2013/0201/p191.html

Common Questions About Bell Palsy - American Family Physician

Feb 1, 2014 - Bell palsy is an acute affliction of the facial nerve, resulting in sudden paralysis or weakness of the muscles on one side of the face. Testing patients with unilateral facial paralysis for diabetes mellitus or Lyme disease is not routinely recommended. Patients with Lyme disease ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2014/0201/p209.html

Recognition and Evaluation of Nontraumatic Subarachnoid Hemorrhage and Ruptured ...

Oct 1, 2013 - Swift diagnosis and treatment are critical for good outcomes in patients with nontraumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage, which is usually caused by a ruptured aneurysm. This type of stroke often results in death or disability. Rates of misdiagnosis and treatment delays for subarachnoid ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2013/1001/p451.html

Evaluation of Suspected Dementia - American Family Physician

Oct 15, 2011 - As the proportion of persons in the United States older than 65 years increases, the prevalence of dementia will increase as well. Risk factors for dementia include age, family history of dementia, apolipoprotein E4 genotype, cardiovascular comorbidities, chronic anticholinergic use, ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2011/1015/p895.html

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