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Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy: A Common Cause of Spinal Cord Dysfunction in Older ...

Sep 1, 2000 - Cervical spondylotic myelopathy is the most common cause of spinal cord dysfunction in older persons. The aging process results in degenerative changes in the cervical spine that, in advanced stages, can cause compression of the spinal cord. Symptoms often develop insidiously and are ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2000/0901/p1064.html

Neurologic Complications of Prostate Cancer - American Family Physician

May 1, 2002 - Neurologic complications continue to pose problems in patients with metastatic prostate cancer. From 15 to 30 percent of metastases are the result of prostate cancer cells traveling through Batson's plexus to the lumbar spine. Metastatic disease in the lumbar area can cause spinal cord ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2002/0501/p1834.html

Pharmacologic Treatment of Alzheimer's Disease: An Update - American Family Physician

Oct 1, 2003 - Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the development of senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, which are associated with neuronal destruction, particularly in cholinergic neurons. Drugs that inhibit the degradation of acetylcholine within synapses are the mainstay of therapy. ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2003/1001/p1365.html

Early Diagnosis of Dementia - American Family Physician

Feb 15, 2001 - Until recently, the most significant issue facing a family physician regarding the diagnosis and treatment of dementia was ruling out delirium and potentially treatable etiologies. However, as more treatment options become available, it will become increasingly important to diagnose ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2001/0215/p703.html

Seizure Disorders in the Elderly - American Family Physician

Jan 15, 2003 - Seizure disorders become increasingly common after the age of 60 years and can have a significant impact on functional status. The goal of antiepileptic drug therapy is to control seizures but preserve quality of life. If possible, seizure control should be achieved with one agent given...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2003/0115/p325.html

Intracranial Aneurysms: Current Evidence and Clinical Practice - American Family Physician

Aug 15, 2002 - Unruptured intracranial aneurysms occur in up to 6 percent of the general population. Most persons with these aneurysms remain asymptomatic and are usually unaware of their presence. Risk factors for the formation of aneurysms include a family history of aneurysm, various inherited ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2002/0815/p601.html

Principles of Office Anesthesia: Part I. Infiltrative Anesthesia - American Family ...

Jul 1, 2002 - The use of effective analgesia is vital for any office procedure in which pain may be inflicted. The ideal anesthetic achieves 100 percent analgesia in a short period of time, works on intact or nonintact skin without systemic side effects, and invokes neither pain nor toxicity. Because...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2002/0701/p91.html

Classification of Tremor and Update on Treatment - American Family Physician

Mar 15, 1999 - Tremor is a symptom of many disorders, including Parkinson's disease, essential tremor, orthostatic tremor, cerebellar disease, peripheral neuropathy and alcohol withdrawal. Tremors may be classified as postural, rest or action tremors. Symptomatic treatment is tailored to the tremor ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1999/0315/p1565.html

Principles of Office Anesthesia Part II: Topical Anesthesia - American Family Physician

Jul 1, 2002 - The development of topical anesthetics has provided the family physician with multiple options in anesthetizing open and intact skin. The combination of tetracaine, adrenaline (epinephrine), and cocaine, better known as TAC, was the first topical agent available for analgesia of ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2002/0701/p99.html

Epilepsy in Women - American Family Physician

Oct 15, 2002 - Epilepsy in women raises special reproductive and general health concerns. Seizure frequency and severity may change at puberty, over the menstrual cycle, with pregnancy, and at menopause. Estrogen is known to increase the risk of seizures, while progesterone has an inhibitory effect. ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2002/1015/p1489.html

Management of Seizures and Epilepsy - American Family Physician

Apr 1, 1998 - While the evaluation and treatment of patients with seizures or epilepsy is often challenging, modern therapy provides many patients with complete seizure control. After a first seizure, evaluation should focus on excluding an underlying neurologic or medical condition, assessing the ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1998/0401/p1589.html

Recognition and Management of Tourette's Syndrome and Tic Disorders - American Family ...

Apr 15, 1999 - Tic disorders and Tourette's syndrome are conditions that primary care physicians are likely to encounter. Up to 20 percent of children have at least a transient tic disorder at some point. Once believed to be rare, Tourette's syndrome is now known to be a more common disorder that ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1999/0415/p2263.html

Charcot Foot: The Diagnostic Dilemma - American Family Physician

Nov 1, 2001 - Primary care physicians involved in the management of patients with diabetes are likely to encounter the diagnostic and treatment challenges of pedal neuropathic joint disease, also known as Charcot foot. The acute Charcot foot is characterized by erythema, edema and elevated ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2001/1101/p1591.html

Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: Lou Gehrig's Disease - American Family Physician

Mar 15, 1999 - Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), commonly called Lou Gehrig's disease, is a progressive neuromuscular condition characterized by weakness, muscle wasting, fasciculations and increased reflexes. Approximately 30,000 Americans currently have the disease. The annual incidence rate is ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1999/0315/p1489.html

Neurological Complications of Scuba Diving - American Family Physician

Jun 1, 2001 - Recreational scuba diving has become a popular sport in the United States, with almost 9 million certified divers. When severe diving injury occurs, the nervous system is frequently involved. In dive-related barotrauma, compressed or expanding gas within the ears, sinuses and lungs ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2001/0601/p2211.html

The "Burner": A Common Nerve Injury in Contact Sports - American Family Physician

Nov 1, 1999 - A

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1999/1101/p2035.html

Concussion in Sports: Minimizing the Risk for Complications - American Family Physician

Sep 15, 2001 - Mild traumatic brain injury, or concussion, is a common consequence of collisions, falls and other forms of contact in sports. Concussion may be defined as an acute trauma-induced alteration of mental function lasting fewer than 24 hours, with or without preceding loss of consciousness....

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2001/0915/p1007.html

Restless Legs Syndrome: Detection and Management in Primary Care - American Family ...

Jul 1, 2000 - Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a neurologic movement disorder that is often associated with a sleep complaint. Patients with RLS have an irresistible urge to move their legs, which is usually due to disagreeable sensations that are worse during periods of inactivity and often interfere...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2000/0701/p108.html

New Concepts In Acute Pain Therapy: Preemptive Analgesia - American Family Physician

May 15, 2001 - Pain, which is often inadequately treated, accompanies the more than 23 million surgical procedures performed each year and may persist long after tissue heals. Preemptive analgesia, an evolving clinical concept, involves the introduction of an analgesic regimen before the onset of ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2001/0515/p1979.html

Advances in the Treatment of Epilepsy - American Family Physician

Jul 1, 2001 - Significant advances have been made in the diagnosis and treatment of epilepsy over the past decade. With the advent of electroencephalographic video monitoring, physicians are now able to reliably differentiate epilepsy from other conditions that can mimic it, such as pseudoseizures. ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2001/0701/p91.html

Newer Anti-Eptileptic Drugs: Gabapentin, Lamotrigine, Felbamate, Topiramate and ...

Feb 1, 1998 - Twenty-five to 40 percent of patients with epilepsy continue to have seizures despite optimal treatment with traditional antiepileptic drugs. Treatment with standard anticonvulsants such as phenytoin, carbamazepine, valproic acid and phenobarbital is often complicated by side effects ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1998/0201/p513.html

Update on Parkinson's Disease - American Family Physician

Apr 15, 1999 - Parkinson's disease is a progressive degenerative disorder of the central nervous system. The hallmark physical signs are tremor, rigidity and bradykinesia. Idiopathic Parkinson's disease is caused by the progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and nigrostriatal...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1999/0415/p2155.html

Neurological Complications of Systemic Cancer - American Family Physician

Feb 15, 1999 - Neurologic complications occur frequently in patients with cancer. After routine chemotherapy, these complications are the most common reason for hospitalization of these patients. Brain metastases are the most prevalent complication, affecting 20 to 40 percent of cancer patients and ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1999/0215/p878.html

Preventing Stroke in Patients with Transient Ischemic Attacks - American Family Physician

Nov 15, 1999 - Stroke is the third most common overall cause of death and the leading cause of adult disability in the United States. New therapeutic interventions instituted in the period immediately after a stroke have revolutionized the approach to ischemic cerebrovascular disease. Recognition of a...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1999/1115/p2329.html

Assessment and Management of Concussion in Sports - American Family Physician

Sep 1, 1999 - The most common head injury in sports is concussion. Athletes who sustain a prolonged loss of consciousness should be transported immediately to a hospital for further evaluation. Assessment of less severe injuries should include a thorough neurologic examination. The duration of ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1999/0901/p887.html

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