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A Clinical Approach to Diagnosing Wrist Pain - American Family Physician

Nov 1, 2005 - A detailed history alone may lead to a specific diagnosis in approximately 70 percent of patients who have wrist pain. Patients who present with spontaneous onset of wrist pain, who have a vague or distant history of trauma, or whose activities consist of repetitive loading could be ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2005/1101/p1753.html

A Systematic Approach to the Evaluation of a Limping Child - American Family Physician

Nov 15, 2015 - A limp is defined as a deviation from a normal age-appropriate gait pattern resulting in an uneven, jerky, or laborious gait. It can be caused by pain, weakness, or deformity as a result of a variety of conditions. Transient synovitis is the most common diagnosis. Other causes of acute ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2015/1115/p908.html

Acute Ankle Sprain: An Update - American Family Physician

Nov 15, 2006 - Acute ankle injury, a common musculoskeletal injury, can cause ankle sprains. Some evidence suggests that previous injuries or limited joint flexibility may contribute to ankle sprains. The initial assessment of an acute ankle injury should include questions about the timing and ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2006/1115/p1714.html

Acute Brachial Plexus Neuritis: An Uncommon Cause of Shoulder Pain - American Family ...

Nov 1, 2000 - Patients with acute brachial plexus neuritis are often misdiagnosed as having cervical radiculopathy. Acute brachial plexus neuritis is an uncommon disorder characterized by severe shoulder and upper arm pain followed by marked upper arm weakness. The temporal profile of pain preceding ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2000/1101/p2067.html

Acute Finger Injuries: Part II. Fractures, Dislocations, and Thumb Injuries - American ...

Mar 1, 2006 - Family physicians can treat most finger fractures and dislocations, but when necessary, prompt referral to an orthopedic or hand surgeon is important to maximize future function. Examination includes radiography (oblique, anteroposterior, and true lateral views) and physical examination...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2006/0301/p827.html

Acute Knee Effusions: A Systematic Approach to Diagnosis - American Family Physician

Apr 15, 2000 - Knee effusions may be the result of trauma, overuse or systemic disease. An understanding of knee pathoanatomy is an invaluable part of making the correct diagnosis and formulating a treatment plan. Taking a thorough medical history is the key component of the evaluation. The most ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2000/0415/p2391.html

Acute Knee Injuries: Use of Decision Rules for Selective Radiograph Ordering - American...

Dec 1, 1999 - Family physicians often encounter patients with acute knee trauma. Radiographs of injured knees are commonly ordered, even though fractures are found in only 6 percent of such patients and emergency department physicians can usually discriminate clinically between fracture and ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1999/1201/p2599.html

Acute Lumbar Disk Pain: Navigating Evaluation and Treatment Choices - American Family ...

Oct 1, 2008 - Acute lumbar disk herniations are the most common cause of sciatica. After excluding emergent causes, such as cauda equina syndrome, epidural abscess, fracture, or malignancy, a six-week trial of conservative management is indicated. Patients should be advised to stay active. If ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2008/1001/p835.html

Acute Shoulder Injuries - American Family Physician

Nov 15, 2004 - The shoulder is the most mobile joint in the human body. The cost of such versatility is an increased risk of injury. It is important that family physicians understand the anatomy of the shoulder, mechanisms of injury, typical physical and radiologic findings, approach to management of ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2004/1115/p1947.html

Acute Shoulder Injuries in Adults - American Family Physician

Jul 15, 2016 - Acute shoulder injuries in adults are often initially managed by family physicians. Common acute shoulder injuries include acromioclavicular joint injuries, clavicle fractures, glenohumeral dislocations, proximal humerus fractures, and rotator cuff tears. Acromioclavicular joint ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2016/0715/p119.html

Adhesive Capsulitis: A Review - American Family Physician

Feb 15, 2011 - Adhesive capsulitis is a common, yet poorly understood, condition causing pain and loss of range of motion in the shoulder. It can occur in isolation or concomitantly with other shoulder conditions (e.g., rotator cuff tendinopathy, bursitis) or diabetes mellitus. It is often ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2011/0215/p417.html

Adhesive Capsulitis: A Sticky Issue - American Family Physician

Apr 1, 1999 - The shoulder is a very complex joint that is crucial to many activities of daily living. Decreased shoulder mobility is a serious clinical finding. A global decrease in shoulder range of motion is called adhesive capsulitis, referring to the actual adherence of the shoulder capsule to ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1999/0401/p1843.html

Adhesive Capsulitis: Diagnosis and Management - American Family Physician

Mar 1, 2019 - Adhesive capsulitis, also known as frozen shoulder, is a common shoulder condition characterized by pain and decreased range of motion, especially in external rotation. Adhesive capsulitis is predominantly an idiopathic condition and has an increased prevalence in patients with diabetes...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2019/0301/p297.html

Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis: Diagnosis and Management - American Family Physician

Feb 1, 2014 - Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis is the most common form of scoliosis, affecting approximately 2% to 4% of adolescents. The incidence of scoliosis is about the same in males and females; however, females have up to a 10-fold greater risk of curve progression. Although most youths with ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2014/0201/p193.html

Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis: Radiologic Decision-Making - American Family Physician

May 1, 2002 - Adolescent onset of severe idiopathic scoliosis has traditionally been evaluated using standing posteroanterior radiographs of the full spine to assess lateral curvature with the Cobb method. The most tilted vertebral bodies above and below the apex of the spinal curve are used to ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2002/0501/p1817.html

Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis: Review and Current Concepts - American Family Physician

Jul 1, 2001 - Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis is present in 2 to 4 percent of children between 10 and 16 years of age. It is defined as a lateral curvature of the spine greater than 10 degrees accompanied by vertebral rotation. It is thought to be a multigene dominant condition with variable ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2001/0701/p111.html

Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury: Diagnosis, Management, and Prevention - American ...

Oct 15, 2010 - There are an estimated 80,000 to 100,000 anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) repairs in the United States each year. Most ACL tears occur from noncontact injuries. Women experience ACL tears up to nine times more often than men. Evaluation of the ACL should be performed immediately after ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2010/1015/p917.html

Anterior Hip Pain - American Family Physician

Oct 15, 1999 - Anterior hip pain is a common complaint with many possible causes. Apophyseal avulsion and slipped capital femoral epiphysis should not be overlooked in adolescents. Muscle and tendon strains are common in adults. Subsequent to accurate diagnosis, strains should improve with rest and ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1999/1015/p1687.html

Apophysitis and Osteochondrosis: Common Causes of Pain in Growing Bones - American ...

May 15, 2019 - Apophysitis and osteochondrosis are common causes of pain in growing bones but have differing etiologies and required management. Apophysitis results from a traction injury to the cartilage and bony attachment of tendons in children and adolescents. Most often it is an overuse injury in...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2019/0515/p610.html

Assessment and Management of Acute Low Back Pain - American Family Physician

Nov 15, 1999 - Acute low back pain is commonly treated by family physicians. In most cases, only conservative therapy is needed. However, the history and physical examination may elicit warning signals that indicate the need for further work-up and treatment. These

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1999/1115/p2299.html

Braces and Splints for Common Musculoskeletal Conditions - American Family Physician

Nov 15, 2018 - Braces and splints can immobilize and protect joints, reduce pain, decrease swelling, and facilitate healing of acute injuries. They are also used for injury prevention and chronic pain reduction, and to alter the function of a joint. The medial unloading (valgus) knee brace is an ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2018/1115/p570.html

Braces and Splints for Musculoskeletal Conditions - American Family Physician

Feb 1, 2007 - Braces and splints can be useful for acute injuries, chronic conditions, and the prevention of injury. There is good evidence to support the use of some braces and splints; others are used because of subjective reports from patients, relatively low cost, and few adverse effects, despite...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2007/0201/p342.html

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome - American Family Physician

Apr 15, 2011 - Carpal tunnel syndrome is the most common entrapment neuropathy, affecting approximately 3 to 6 percent of adults in the general population. Although the cause is not usually determined, it can include trauma, repetitive maneuvers, certain diseases, and pregnancy. Symptoms are related ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2011/0415/p952.html

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Diagnosis and Management - American Family Physician

Dec 15, 2016 - Carpal tunnel syndrome, the most common entrapment neuropathy of the upper extremity, is caused by compression of the median nerve as it travels through the carpal tunnel. Classically, patients with the condition experience pain and paresthesias in the distribution of the median nerve, ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2016/1215/p993.html

Cerebral Palsy: An Overview - American Family Physician

Jan 1, 2006 - The presentation of cerebral palsy can be global mental and physical dysfunction or isolated disturbances in gait, cognition, growth, or sensation. It is the most common childhood physical disability and affects 2 to 2.5 children per 1,000 born in the United States. The differential ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2006/0101/p91.html

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