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Unexplained Lymphadenopathy: Evaluation and Differential Diagnosis - American Family ...

Dec 1, 2016 - Lymphadenopathy is benign and self-limited in most patients. Etiologies include malignancy, infection, and autoimmune disorders, as well as medications and iatrogenic causes. The history and physical examination alone usually identify the cause of lymphadenopathy. When the cause is ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2016/1201/p896.html

Diagnosis and Treatment of Acute Uncomplicated Cystitis - American Family Physician

Oct 1, 2011 - Urinary tract infections are the most common bacterial infections in women. Most urinary tract infections are acute uncomplicated cystitis. Identifiers of acute uncomplicated cystitis are frequency and dysuria in an immunocompetent woman of childbearing age who has no comorbidities or ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2011/1001/p771.html

Prolonged Febrile Illness and Fever of Unknown Origin in Adults - American Family ...

Jul 15, 2014 - Fever of unknown origin has been described as a febrile illness (temperature of 101°F [38.3°C] or higher) for three weeks or longer without an etiology despite a one-week inpatient evaluation. A more recent qualitative definition requires only a reasonable diagnostic evaluation. ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2014/0715/p91.html

Preventive Health Care for Men Who Have Sex with Men - American Family Physician

Jun 15, 2015 - Men who have sex with men (MSM) comprise at least 4% of males in the United States. MSM may describe themselves as gay, bisexual, or heterosexual. Because current medical practice does not always facilitate discussion of sexual behaviors, this group of men may face barriers to receiving...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2015/0615/p844.html

Diagnosis and Initial Management of Acute HIV Infection - American Family Physician

May 15, 2010 - Recognition and diagnosis of acute human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in the primary care setting presents an opportunity for patient education and health promotion. Symptoms of acute HIV infection are nonspecific (e.g., fever, malaise, myalgias, rash), making misdiagnosis ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2010/0515/p1239.html

Identification and Management of Latent Tuberculosis Infection - American Family Physician

May 15, 2009 - Latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is a condition in which a person is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, but does not currently have active tuberculosis disease. An estimated 10 to 15 million persons in the United States have LTBI. Because 5 to 10 percent of persons with LTBI ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2009/0515/p879.html

Diagnosis of Lyme Disease - American Family Physician

Jul 15, 2005 - The use of serologic testing and its value in the diagnosis of Lyme disease remain confusing and controversial for physicians, especially concerning persons who are at low risk for the disease. The approach to diagnosing Lyme disease varies depending on the probability of disease (based...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2005/0715/p297.html

Evaluation of Pregnant Women Exposed to Respiratory Viruses - American Family Physician

May 15, 2000 - Prenatal patients are often exposed to respiratory viruses at home and at work. Understandably, these patients may be concerned and want immediate answers and advice from their physicians. While most women who are exposed to chickenpox are immune, serologic testing can be performed and ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2000/0515/p3065.html

Hepatitis C: Part I. Routine Serologic Testing and Diagnosis - American Family Physician

Jan 1, 1999 - Hepatitis C, which is caused by the hepatitis C virus (HCV), is a major public health problem in the United States. HCV is most efficiently transmitted through large or repeated percutaneous exposures to blood. Most patients with acute HCV infection develop persistent infection, and 70 ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1999/0101/p79.html

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